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#1 Serge Teulon

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 10:52 AM

Hi Guys and Girls,

Did a search and couldn't find a conclusive topic on this.
Can someone describe what effect would an ENR & CCE printing process have? Why would these processes be implemented?
And also any other information would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers

Edited by Serge Teulon, 21 November 2008 - 10:53 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 10:56 AM

They leave black silver in the print that is normally removed during processing, just to not the same degree as a skip-bleach process, which leaves all the silver in. ENR can be modified to different strengths of effect; CCE is just slightly less strong than a full skip-bleach.

They involve additional b&w developer tanks in the print processing line (so ENR is not available for neg processing.)

Leaving silver in the print makes the blacks denser and the contrast higher, it darkens colors, and it adds some additional grain, but it is silver grain, not color dye clouds.
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#3 Serge Teulon

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 11:16 AM

Thanks David.

From what I gather the CCE process is a diluted process of BB. And as BB increases contrast, do you know why the CCE process was implemented in "saving private ryan"? It was after all a high contrast film.

Would it have not made more sense to BB?

Edited by Serge Teulon, 21 November 2008 - 11:17 AM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 05:06 AM

Thanks David.

From what I gather the CCE process is a diluted process of BB. And as BB increases contrast, do you know why the CCE process was implemented in "saving private ryan"? It was after all a high contrast film.

Would it have not made more sense to BB?


They are rather similar in effect -- probably they just didn't want as extreme an effect as a straight bleach-bypass. Also, I believe that the CCE process, like ENR, is permanent, whereas a bleach-bypass print can always later be put through a bleach step and the silver removed.
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#5 Serge Teulon

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 07:16 AM

I see....it makes sense then, to use those processes', if you can control how much of that effect you want to implement.
And it also gives us more overall control in the final output.

That's very helpful, thanks!

One final questions that has sprung to ming - You said previously that the ENR process can be modified to different strengths, I took it that you don't have that flexibility with the CCE process.
Is that the only reason why you would pick ENR over a CCE process? Or are there other reasons?

Edited by Serge Teulon, 22 November 2008 - 07:21 AM.

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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 01:29 PM

I see....it makes sense then, to use those processes', if you can control how much of that effect you want to implement.
And it also gives us more overall control in the final output.

That's very helpful, thanks!

One final questions that has sprung to ming - You said previously that the ENR process can be modified to different strengths, I took it that you don't have that flexibility with the CCE process.
Is that the only reason why you would pick ENR over a CCE process? Or are there other reasons?


Deluxe has both CCE and ACE -- ACE is the same thing as ENR. So if CCE is too strong, you pick some degree of ACE. Same goes at Technicolor, you can choose full skip-bleach, the OZ process (similar to CCE), or ENR. They are the only two labs I know of that offer ENR or ACE type processes, most can just do skip-bleach or a partial skip-bleach.
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#7 Serge Teulon

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 09:26 AM

That's great! Thanks very much!

Cheers
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