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Soviet Macro Lens Kit on it's way from Kiev!


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 04:47 AM

I recently bought this kit for my Kinor 35C and Kinor PII:

http://cgi.ebay.com/...I...A:IT&ih=020

It's on it's way to me and it would be nice if I knew what the Hell it can be used for. :D Can anyone elaborate on some possible uses? I figured tight shots of the iris with maybe a dolly back to reveal the eye, miniatures small detail shots. I also wanted to know what the strengths, weaknesses, limitations and advantages of a lens set like this might be. Also that dual aperture setting gizmo intrigues me. Why would that be on there? Thanks-Steve B)
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#2 Patrick Neary

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 10:30 AM

wow, you're going to be able to start production on "Microcosmos-II: even closer shots of bugs" !

That is one hard-core macro set-up. You'll be able to shoot close-ups of a flea's eyelashes. The hard part comes with exposures, in that you'll have to compensate with longer and longer exposures as your magnification goes up. Your depth of field will also be zilch, even closed down to f16, 22, so focus is extraordinarily critical. There are easy to find charts for determining exposure compensation though, and maybe someone will chime in here.

I occasionally use a macro bellows set up for stills, and it's great fun, but very challenging.
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#3 Paul Bruening

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 11:13 AM

wow, you're going to be able to start production on "Microcosmos-II: even closer shots of bugs" !

That is one hard-core macro set-up. You'll be able to shoot close-ups of a flea's eyelashes. The hard part comes with exposures, in that you'll have to compensate with longer and longer exposures as your magnification goes up. Your depth of field will also be zilch, even closed down to f16, 22, so focus is extraordinarily critical. There are easy to find charts for determining exposure compensation though, and maybe someone will chime in here.

I occasionally use a macro bellows set up for stills, and it's great fun, but very challenging.


Okay. Steven can get facial close-ups of fleas. But, can they act?
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#4 Patrick Neary

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 11:28 AM

I don't know about their acting skills, but he'll save a ton of money on craft service!

"ok everybody, hop on!"
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#5 Paul Bruening

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 03:31 PM

.

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#6 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 25 November 2008 - 03:42 AM

Okay. Steven can get facial close-ups of fleas. But, can they act?


Well their range is gonna be limited but they should do EXCELLENT for stunt work!!! I mean have you ever SEEN a flea circus? If I could just get the ones that ride that tiny bike for a car chase sequence we could do an homage to Steve McQueen on a tabletop electric train layout. I wounder where I could get a 3mm Big Block Mustang ......OR if I could get Flea from the Chili Peppers to do a cameo that would lock up the 18 to 35 demographic.

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 25 November 2008 - 03:44 AM.

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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 11:52 PM

The set got here today and OH MY GOD!!!!! This set is gorgeous! It literally looks like it JUST came out of the factory. It came with EVERYTHING..........EXCEPT, the manual. Theres a bunch of stuff there which I have NO idea what it would be used for. I'm assuming they are adapters for various camera mounts. I'm also not quite sure how it focuses. There doesn't seem to be any focus on the lenses what so ever. I DID have an electronic motor to change the f stop setting within a range with a button that is on a housing designed to sit on top of the stabilized Konvas motor. Maybe you have to physically move in and out to focus. It's gonna be a bit of a challenge to figure out all this stuff.
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#8 Ira Ratner

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 05:46 AM

Can you do single frame on the Kinor? If so, I would think that would be your first step, shooting hundreds of frames.

Next, don't you actually focus with the bellows? That's why the lenses don't have focusing rings.

Finally, I hope your tripod is built like a tank. Once you get that close, if you fart in the same room, you'll see it in the exposure.

Well, one of MY farts anyway.
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#9 Ira Ratner

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 05:49 AM

Tried to delete this double post. Can't.

Edited by Ira Ratner, 04 December 2008 - 05:51 AM.

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#10 John Sprung

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 01:40 PM

. It came with EVERYTHING..........EXCEPT, the manual. . I'm also not quite sure how it focuses. .

In the extreme macro range, the distance you have to move the lens in order to focus is so large that you do it with the rack and bellows. You might try Anatoly at Slow Motion Inc for a lead on any manual that may have existed, or for technical info. He was a top technician at MosKinAp in the old days.






-- J.S.
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#11 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 10:39 PM

In the extreme macro range, the distance you have to move the lens in order to focus is so large that you do it with the rack and bellows. You might try Anatoly at Slow Motion Inc for a lead on any manual that may have existed, or for technical info. He was a top technician at MosKinAp in the old days.
-- J.S.


That's what I was thinking but it also comes with the extension tubes which would eliminate any possibility of bellows movement, Maybe you just moved back and forth to find focus when using the extension tubes, I'm not sure. I'm fairly sure the f-stop solenoid (for lack of a better word) has something to do with DOF and focus as well but I'll DEFINITELY check with Anatoly and see if he knows anything. The kit was made by to Soviet CKBK (Central Design Bureau of Cinematography in Moscow) which is suppose to be their premiere lens making and experimental entity during the cold war so I have no doubt these lenses aare as close to perfect as they could have made them. I have no IDEA what a comparable western macro lens kit would cost made by Ziess or Cooke or even if the MADE a similar kit. I cant wait to get the Kinor PII here so I can try them out. :D
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#12 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 11:05 PM

Can you do single frame on the Kinor? If so, I would think that would be your first step, shooting hundreds of frames.

Next, don't you actually focus with the bellows? That's why the lenses don't have focusing rings.

Finally, I hope your tripod is built like a tank. Once you get that close, if you fart in the same room, you'll see it in the exposure.

Well, one of MY farts anyway.


Remind me to avoid your house on Mexican night :blink: The tripod is a wooden Mitchell with an O'Connor 100 and a heavy duty aluminum spreader, so It should handle the weight with NO problem considering it was designed for a much heavier camera. The Kinor was not designed to do single frame shots, in fact the only single frame capable 35mm motion picture camera I have is the Konvas-1 which has an animation crank but that one has an OCT-18 mount which is the Soviet version of an Arri Standard mount. The macro lens kit uses an OCT-19 mount is the Russian copy of the BNCR mount so the 2 are not compatible unless you want to use and OCT-18 mount lens on a OCT-19 camera, they do make an adapter for that application but of course not vice versa so I guess I'll have to wing it with 35mm movie film. :D
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