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#1 Guillaume Vallee

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 11:27 PM

Hi folks. I just bought some Kodak developer D-76 from a guy and I was wondering if I can hand-process black and white film with it.
Thanks :)
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#2 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 25 November 2008 - 04:44 AM

Hi folks. I just bought some Kodak developer D-76 from a guy and I was wondering if I can hand-process black and white film with it.
Thanks :)

There is no reason why you can't use it, provded it is fairly fresh. I assume it is a powder, if it is a solution then it might not be much good if it has been around a while as it could have oxidised.
D76 is a standard Kodak formulation for stills negative. The motion picture equivalent, D96, has a slightly different formualtion for use in a continuous processing machine.
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#3 Guillaume Vallee

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Posted 25 November 2008 - 11:44 PM

Ok thank you !

I'm not use with black and white processing. Does anybody have a formula for this kind of process (even if it's home-made). :D
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#4 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 26 November 2008 - 09:08 AM

Ok thank you !

I'm not use with black and white processing. Does anybody have a formula for this kind of process (even if it's home-made). :D


Have a look at this document on the Kodak website;

http://motion.kodak....h2415_h2415.pdf

It will tell you most of what you want to know. Otherwise any good photographic manual will tell you about processing. Motion Picture is just like Stills except the film is in longer lengths.

Brian
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#5 Gregory Almond

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 06:40 PM

So say i have 3 foot lengths of 16mm film i wanted to hand process, Kodak 7222, I can use the d-76 developer for this film? Is there anything that i would have to compensate for, or will my standard Darkroom chemistry work?
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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 03:39 AM

The combination of 7222 and D-76 is something most harmless. You cannot fail. I have nine years experience in commercial hand-processing of movie film.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 05:37 AM

D-76 will work without any problems with B&W cine film. It was, after all, originally designed as a fine-grained motion-picture film developer.
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#8 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 10:18 AM

D-76 will work without any problems with B&W cine film. It was, after all, originally designed as a fine-grained motion-picture film developer.

Not quite true, Karl, D76 is a stills developer; the motion picture equivalent is D96.
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#9 Gregory Almond

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 10:46 AM

I'm aware that D-96 is the standard film developer for Kodak BW films. I just can't seem to find any place that sells it. I guess i probably will have to contact a sales rep from Kodak, However i can readily find d-76. Thats why i am asking.
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#10 Simon Wyss

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 05:43 PM

Let's see now, Eastman-Kodak D(eveloper Recipe) 76 of 1927 is made out of 750 ml water at 50º C to begin, 2 g Metol, 100 g dehydrated sodium sulfite, 5 g Hydroquinone, and 2 g Borax, to be completed for 1000 ml. Replenisher (solution) contains 3 g Metol, 100 g sodium sulfite, 7.5 g Hydroquinone, 20 g Borax.

D. 96 or D-96 provides for Metol and Hydroquinone in a 1:1 ratio, namely 1.5 g of each per 1000 ml, 75 g of sodium sulfite, 0.8 sodium bromide, and 4.5 g of Borax (sodium-tetraborate-10-hydrate).

The emulsion of a stock like Eastman Plus-X negative -231 is in no point different from the still photography Plus-X film. Tri-X ciné film wouldn't be anything else than photo Tri-X coatings, either. Only the more recent T(afelkristall)-Max emulsions behave in a little other manner.

Can anybody explain us in detail what happens when a cubic silver-salt gelatine film is bathed in developer solutions like these? Where would differences come from?

With all classic films you have silver "wool" protuberances that actually form the visible image's delineation. That is basically inherent with the chemical developing contrary to physical developing which is a more fine-grained silver deposit out of the solution on the light-struck crystals.

If you want better black-and-white imagery (at the price of less sensitivity gain) you may try Gigabitfilm®. I'll be in Los Angeles during February.
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#11 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 09:24 PM

Let's see now, Eastman-Kodak D(eveloper Recipe) 76 of 1927 is made out of 750 ml water at 50º C to begin, 2 g Metol, 100 g dehydrated sodium sulfite, 5 g Hydroquinone, and 2 g Borax, to be completed for 1000 ml. Replenisher (solution) contains 3 g Metol, 100 g sodium sulfite, 7.5 g Hydroquinone, 20 g Borax.

D. 96 or D-96 provides for Metol and Hydroquinone in a 1:1 ratio, namely 1.5 g of each per 1000 ml, 75 g of sodium sulfite, 0.8 sodium bromide, and 4.5 g of Borax (sodium-tetraborate-10-hydrate).


Yes D-76 is a classic. I understand that the packaged version actually has a slightly differnet formula as the Ph will drift if you mix the original versio. Ilford ID-11 (Ilford developer 11) is also almost the same solution, but may be easier to buy in some areas.

The D-96 is likly modified to reduce the Gamma slightly as MP film does traditionaly go through a couple of extra generations and so benifits from more range.

Kodak does publish the formulas for D-96 and mixing from Scratch may be the easies way to get it.

Reading something like "The Darkroom Cookbook" by Anchell will give you a few dozzen more simalar formulas. for example Ansco 17 which is suposed to give more grain and more sharpness 1.5g metol, 80g sulfite, 3 g hydroquineone, 3g granular borax, .5g kBr. for a liter of mix - hum, comes right between the two above!
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#12 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 03:34 AM

Yes D-76 is a classic. I understand that the packaged version actually has a slightly differnet formula as the Ph will drift if you mix the original versio. Ilford ID-11 (Ilford developer 11) is also almost the same solution, but may be easier to buy in some areas.

The D-96 is likly modified to reduce the Gamma slightly as MP film does traditionaly go through a couple of extra generations and so benifits from more range.

Kodak does publish the formulas for D-96 and mixing from Scratch may be the easies way to get it.

Reading something like "The Darkroom Cookbook" by Anchell will give you a few dozzen more simalar formulas. for example Ansco 17 which is suposed to give more grain and more sharpness 1.5g metol, 80g sulfite, 3 g hydroquineone, 3g granular borax, .5g kBr. for a liter of mix - hum, comes right between the two above!

D76 which is (was) avaialble as a packaged chemical, is essential a 1 shot developer designed to be used once and thrown away. D96 is only available as a formula and is designed for continuous processing machines and to be replenished with D96R. The formula published is only a starting point and the chemist at the lab would modify the replenisher depending on the leader/ film ratio to maintain the sensitometric properties of the process.
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#13 Simon Wyss

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 06:12 AM

D76 which is (was) avaialble as a packaged chemical, is essential a 1 shot developer designed to be used once and thrown away. D96 is only available as a formula and is designed for continuous processing machines and to be replenished with D96R. The formula published is only a starting point and the chemist at the lab would modify the replenisher depending on the leader/ film ratio to maintain the sensitometric properties of the process.
Brian

Correct. Only this added: D-76 and D-96 are not true fine grain developers. For such intention one has to switch to a different family of reducing agents. Lumière and Seyewetz came up with paraphenylenediamine and orthoaminophenol in 1904.
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#14 K Borowski

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 06:42 AM

My biggest problem with "fine grain" developers is that they basically accomplish this by the sue of a silver solvent (there is basically a chemical in the developer that eats away at the edges of silver grains).

Unfortunately, with the film sizes used i MP photography, I don't think there is any way around this. I am pretty sure that the ECN-2 developer and maybe the E-6 color developer have silver solvent action.

Actually, eating away at grains isn't as bad as it sounds, because it isn't complete dissolution of any grains in the film, but it does result in a loss of sharpness to some extent to achieve this finer-grainedness.
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#15 Simon Wyss

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 12:22 PM

My biggest problem with "fine grain" developers is that they basically accomplish this by the sue of a silver solvent (there is basically a chemical in the developer that eats away at the edges of silver grains).

Correct, again. It is the sodium sulfite which acts first as conserving agent for the reducing agents, second as a weak alkali and third as a solvent of silver halides.
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#16 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 09:25 PM

D76 which is (was) avaialble as a packaged chemical, is essential a 1 shot developer designed to be used once and thrown away.

Most of the time that is true. In fact generaly D-76 is used diluted 1:1. There _IS_ however a D-76R replensiher, which I have even seen for sale at one time in the past few years. It is mainly used by Still Labs who do "Dip and Dunk" processing as I understand it.

Anchell gives it as Metol 3 g, Na Sulfite 100g, hydroquinone 7.5g, Borax 20g for a liter. Replace 30Ml of developer for every 80 square inches (1 8X10 Sheet, 1 36 Exp Roll, 1 120 roll) of film developed.

I must admit that most of my still processing over the years has been with Rodinol.
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#17 Simon Wyss

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 07:54 AM

I must admit that most of my still processing over the years has been with Rodinol.

Funny, in Europe it's Rodinal. When it was put on the market by Agfa Mr. Auguste Rodin was en vogue.
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#18 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 08:06 PM

Funny, in Europe it's Rodinal. When it was put on the market by Agfa Mr. Auguste Rodin was en vogue.

Probaly is in my Basement also, :( :blink: :rolleyes: I am always switching in the wrong letters. and I did not go downstairs to check out the label on the bottle. :o
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#19 Simon Wyss

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 03:11 AM

Charles, will you now go down there and fetch that bottle !

This is the sort of mistakes which ruins civilization. Do you want me to not sleep anymore ?
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#20 K Borowski

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 10:50 AM

No, it is spelled "Rodinal" in the U.S. too. Maybe it's just Canada that is special?
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