Jump to content


Photo

3d Film on 16mm


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Jason Anderson

Jason Anderson
  • Sustaining Members
  • 75 posts
  • Student
  • Denver, Co

Posted 25 November 2008 - 08:31 PM

I am interested in shooting a 3d film on 16mm, any suggestions as to what cameras I should use or if you know of some titles that were shot on 16mm or 8mm and what technique was used.

jason
  • 0

#2 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 25 November 2008 - 09:26 PM

I am interested in shooting a 3d film on 16mm, any suggestions as to what cameras I should use or if you know of some titles that were shot on 16mm or 8mm and what technique was used.

jason



Unsure why this is in the Bolex forum, but if you want to do 3D you'll xtal synced cameras to keep temporal lag to a minimum.

The general profile of a wind up with a motor is too wide in that when it is put next to another for the required parallax is a little too far apart for optimum separation - the EL and EBM models may work well however, especially the EBM which is the thinner of the two. I suppose you only need one EBM (on the left from behind) the other can be whatever as long as it is xtal synced and has the same lenses etc. The way around using just one camera is having it sideways to the action with two front surface mirrors at 90deg (well, actually 80 something and 90 something degrees).

Probably better cameras suited to it - but hey, this is the Bolex forum ;)
  • 0

#3 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 25 November 2008 - 10:00 PM

Bolex made a 3D attachment for their cameras, I suspect it's a bit hard to find these days.
  • 0

#4 Jason Anderson

Jason Anderson
  • Sustaining Members
  • 75 posts
  • Student
  • Denver, Co

Posted 26 November 2008 - 12:19 AM

Thanks for the responses, yeah, there is a lens attachment that splits the frame into two parts, Does anyone know the work flow for such a setup? http://www.retrothin...lex_16mm_m.html
  • 0

#5 David Auner aac

David Auner aac
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 November 2008 - 04:16 AM

Thanks for the responses, yeah, there is a lens attachment that splits the frame into two parts, Does anyone know the work flow for such a setup? http://www.retrothin...lex_16mm_m.html


IIRC you put the attachment on the camera when you shoot. The film is processed normally (I think) and when you project it, you put the same attachment on the projector. There is some info that thingie in Andrew Alden's Bolex Bible. If you want more info I could look it up for you.

Cheers, Dave
  • 0

#6 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1415 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 27 November 2008 - 01:15 PM

I have one or two of the simple Kern C-mount stereo lenses, not the projection lens. I did some trial work in 3-D about 15 years ago. It is quite fascinating.

Now, if you're on the chase for such optics, try to get hold of the "big" Bolex-Kern stereo lens which is the one with a circular housing front. In it there are two sets of prisms that allow shooting closer and close-up. In a third position you have no prisms in front of the openings so that the lenses look parallel forward. The paired lenses are 5.6 mm apart (two simple coated Yvar triplets 12.5-2.8, fixed focus at 3 m or 10 ft.). The stereo base is 64 mm. One set of prisms will allocate the view on 3½ feet, the other provides for 2 feet.

Domestic stereo lenses were given the inscription Kern-Paillard Stereo, those for export Bolex Stereo.

A protruding 11 mm diameter bushing must be set on the camera turret instead of the washer under the central fastening screw.

The project started in 1950. First devices came to the shops in 1953.
  • 0

#7 Jason Anderson

Jason Anderson
  • Sustaining Members
  • 75 posts
  • Student
  • Denver, Co

Posted 27 November 2008 - 01:39 PM

IIRC you put the attachment on the camera when you shoot. The film is processed normally (I think) and when you project it, you put the same attachment on the projector. There is some info that thingie in Andrew Alden's Bolex Bible. If you want more info I could look it up for you.

Cheers, Dave


Thanks, that makes sense, but if I wanted a digital copy as well, may be more tricky.
  • 0

#8 Jason Anderson

Jason Anderson
  • Sustaining Members
  • 75 posts
  • Student
  • Denver, Co

Posted 27 November 2008 - 01:45 PM

I have one or two of the simple Kern C-mount stereo lenses, not the projection lens. I did some trial work in 3-D about 15 years ago. It is quite fascinating.

Now, if you're on the chase for such optics, try to get hold of the "big" Bolex-Kern stereo lens which is the one with a circular housing front. In it there are two sets of prisms that allow shooting closer and close-up. In a third position you have no prisms in front of the openings so that the lenses look parallel forward. The paired lenses are 5.6 mm apart (two simple coated Yvar triplets 12.5-2.8, fixed focus at 3 m or 10 ft.). The stereo base is 64 mm. One set of prisms will allocate the view on 3½ feet, the other provides for 2 feet.

Domestic stereo lenses were given the inscription Kern-Paillard Stereo, those for export Bolex Stereo.

A protruding 11 mm diameter bushing must be set on the camera turret instead of the washer under the central fastening screw.

The project started in 1950. First devices came to the shops in 1953.


Thank you for the info

What do you think about syncing two bolexs?
  • 0

#9 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1415 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 27 November 2008 - 03:05 PM

Why not, lab gets twice the footage to work on . . .
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Visual Products

CineTape

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Glidecam

Opal

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Opal

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Technodolly

Metropolis Post