Jump to content


Photo

Cinematography jargon???


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 Nick Centera

Nick Centera
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 88 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • San Diego

Posted 28 November 2008 - 02:43 PM

Hey, I was wondering if there was a place on the internet, or a book, or something that has a definition for different names for stuff. I have heard so many things that I have no clue and I want to know. I know that this should come in time with experience, but if I get on set and the DoP asks me to get something and I have no clue what it is, then I will not look as good. So if you have any advice or anything let me know. Thanks
  • 0

#2 Joshua Jackson

Joshua Jackson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
  • Director
  • Seattle, WA

Posted 28 November 2008 - 03:06 PM

Are you AC?
An AC, gaffer, and grip are all going to pretty much have their own bibles with their own glossaries that are going to be more than long enough. Not that terms don't bleed into each other. Other than books, I've found that I'm learning the most by listening to commentaries, talking to experienced people on this board, and reading magazines like American Cinematographer and ICG. I'm young, so saying that I'm still learning isn't that big of a deal, but I'm sure many veterans here can tell you that they still do and that their's no shame is not knowing something if you are making 100% effort to learn everything that you can.
Which is also why it's bad to lie on your resume. I'd rather come on a shoot with a humbled resume and exceed expectation, than to fluff up my resume beyond my current means and fail to meet the mark.
  • 0

#3 Serge Teulon

Serge Teulon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London UK

Posted 28 November 2008 - 03:22 PM

Hey Nick,

Joshua is right in everything that he's pointed out.
I must emphasise that there is no reason why you should feel ashamed if you don't understand what's just been said to you.
No matter how experienced you are, you are always making mistakes and learning from them.

As long as you are not trying to fool ppl then you have no reason to concern about your inexperience.
Instead use that energy in other ways.
  • 0

#4 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1415 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 28 November 2008 - 03:58 PM

One expression in German is: "gestorben" (has died). It is pronounced by the director or sometimes by a stronger executive producer meaning all takes of a set-up are in the box, "im Kasten". How does one call on that situation which is not a wrap ?
  • 0

#5 Matt Workman

Matt Workman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 421 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • NYC

Posted 28 November 2008 - 04:51 PM

I read this when I first started and is a pretty good start
http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/1400097592

Just watch out, if you use half of this stuff people will look at you funny. I think more and more common is to use the actual names of equipment, from the manufacturer. Memorize all of the lights on the Mole Richardson site and all of the grip equipment on the Matthews site. That stuff is everywhere.

Over a long project with a crew you might start to have nicknames for stuff. I definitely use short hand like book lights, skylights, foot lights, eyelight, etc. but that usually refers to my reasoning for the particular lighting setup.

Make up new jargon and pretend like everyone else doesn't know what they are taking about. Likewise look out for the old bag of apertures gag... :lol:

Matt
  • 0

#6 Mike Washlesky

Mike Washlesky
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 194 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Austin,TX

Posted 01 December 2008 - 10:44 AM

I read this when I first started and is a pretty good start
http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/1400097592

Just watch out, if you use half of this stuff people will look at you funny. I think more and more common is to use the actual names of equipment, from the manufacturer. Memorize all of the lights on the Mole Richardson site and all of the grip equipment on the Matthews site. That stuff is everywhere.

Over a long project with a crew you might start to have nicknames for stuff. I definitely use short hand like book lights, skylights, foot lights, eyelight, etc. but that usually refers to my reasoning for the particular lighting setup.

Make up new jargon and pretend like everyone else doesn't know what they are taking about. Likewise look out for the old bag of apertures gag... :lol:

Matt



I love the old Apertures bit. I too like to make up names for things especially when working with a green crew, because they dont know any better. You can totally make up random names for things. Here's a few:

Monitor = Picture box (say it with a southern twang, works great)
batteries = juice box
electrical cable(stingers) = juice straw
china ball on a c-stand = glow pop
power outlet = holes
clapboard/slate = flat gator
grip truck = lite box
tripod/sticks = camera lifter
  • 0

#7 Simon Wyss

Simon Wyss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1415 posts
  • Other
  • Basel, Switzerland

Posted 01 December 2008 - 11:20 AM

― pimp my crank ― :o
  • 0

#8 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 01 December 2008 - 11:38 AM

One expression in German is: "gestorben" (has died). It is pronounced by the director or sometimes by a stronger executive producer meaning all takes of a set-up are in the box, "im Kasten". How does one call on that situation which is not a wrap ?



"In the can"
  • 0

#9 Brendan Fish

Brendan Fish
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Johannesburg, South Africa

Posted 01 December 2008 - 03:05 PM

I read this when I first started and is a pretty good start
http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/1400097592

Just watch out, if you use half of this stuff people will look at you funny. I think more and more common is to use the actual names of equipment, from the manufacturer. Memorize all of the lights on the Mole Richardson site and all of the grip equipment on the Matthews site. That stuff is everywhere.

Over a long project with a crew you might start to have nicknames for stuff. I definitely use short hand like book lights, skylights, foot lights, eyelight, etc. but that usually refers to my reasoning for the particular lighting setup.

Make up new jargon and pretend like everyone else doesn't know what they are taking about. Likewise look out for the old bag of apertures gag... :lol:

Matt



Hi.

Like the "bag of apetures" line

I have also heard of being sent to the Grips truck for a "long weight".
I also heard of a P.A. being sent to the editors for a box of tone and some extra colour bars.

That has to be one of my favorites ever
  • 0

#10 John Brawley

John Brawley
  • Sustaining Members
  • 834 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Atlanta Georgia

Posted 01 December 2008 - 03:42 PM

Hi.

Like the "bag of apetures" line

I have also heard of being sent to the Grips truck for a "long weight".
I also heard of a P.A. being sent to the editors for a box of tone and some extra colour bars.

That has to be one of my favorites ever



This has been discussed on this board before.

It's common at one of the TV stations here to get the new PA to run to the front gate and get the chroma keys.

There's plenty here as well

http://www.lemac.com...ech/jargon.html

jb
  • 0

#11 Ralph Keyser

Ralph Keyser
  • Sustaining Members
  • 120 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 01 December 2008 - 06:35 PM

One expression in German is: "gestorben" (has died). It is pronounced by the director or sometimes by a stronger executive producer meaning all takes of a set-up are in the box, "im Kasten". How does one call on that situation which is not a wrap ?


The phrase I usually hear is "moving on" - we've got everything we need with this set-up and we're moving to the next one.

To Nick's original question, I wouldn't worry too much. If some one asks you for something and uses a term you aren't familiar with, just tell them you aren't familiar with that term. What is it? Different folks have different "jargon". Even the standard terms don't seem to be immune. Nobody's going to think badly of you for asking - well, maybe the third or fourth time you ask :)
  • 0

#12 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 01 December 2008 - 06:49 PM

When I worked on live golf we used to send the green utility back to the truck guy to get a cable stretcher. They always came back with a 200 footer of course. We also used to park our golf carts in front of a porta potty someone had just gone into, but that's a whole other story....

I hear new slang all the time from DP's, AD's, AC's, PA's...you name it. Most of the time it's something that's a joke between a few people and they often enjoy it when you ask, especially if you get a chuckle out of it. But if you ask what the Martini is you're gonna get a lot of funny looks.
  • 0

#13 Edgar Dubrovskiy

Edgar Dubrovskiy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 02 December 2008 - 05:32 AM

"Happiness?" before rolling (or after just rolled) is in the air on London sets all the time.
  • 0

#14 Mike Washlesky

Mike Washlesky
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 194 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Austin,TX

Posted 02 December 2008 - 10:41 AM

When I worked on live golf we used to send the green utility back to the truck guy to get a cable stretcher. They always came back with a 200 footer of course. We also used to park our golf carts in front of a porta potty someone had just gone into, but that's a whole other story....

I hear new slang all the time from DP's, AD's, AC's, PA's...you name it. Most of the time it's something that's a joke between a few people and they often enjoy it when you ask, especially if you get a chuckle out of it. But if you ask what the Martini is you're gonna get a lot of funny looks.



oh man,cable stretcher - I forgot about that one!
  • 0

#15 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 02 December 2008 - 06:47 PM

oh man,cable stretcher - I forgot about that one!

It's an oldie, but a goodie.
  • 0

#16 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 719 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 02 December 2008 - 11:44 PM

Btw, if anyone mentions that they're "10-1" or "10-2" it's referring to them leaving the set for a bathroom break. lol. It's not a reference to a type of "stinger"= (extension cord).
  • 0

#17 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 December 2008 - 01:45 PM

Btw, if anyone mentions that they're "10-1" or "10-2" it's referring to them leaving the set for a bathroom break. lol. It's not a reference to a type of "stinger"= (extension cord).

The other thing we used to do to convey that message silently was to make a motion with both hands of wringing water from an invisible towel. Of course 10-1 would be useless as a piece of cable, and 10-2 wouldn't be allowed any more because it lacks a ground.





-- J.S.
  • 0

#18 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 03 December 2008 - 01:55 PM

We don't see much Hellywood action out here in the hinterlands. So, we make up a bunch of jargon as we go. Some of it is language for things we need better words for. Some of it is simple indulgence to make us feel "cool". I guess that goes on all over the great expanse of movie making wastelands.

Attached Images

  • stinger.jpg

  • 0

#19 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 719 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 December 2008 - 06:06 PM

I didn't mean to suggest that 10-1 or 10-2 could be mistaken for a stinger that actually exists. It was meant to clarify that it's not an electric reference at all. If he heard of a 12-3 etc, he might assume someone saying 10-1 was grabbing a cable.
  • 0

#20 Mike Washlesky

Mike Washlesky
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 194 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Austin,TX

Posted 03 December 2008 - 06:46 PM

I didn't mean to suggest that 10-1 or 10-2 could be mistaken for a stinger that actually exists. It was meant to clarify that it's not an electric reference at all. If he heard of a 12-3 etc, he might assume someone saying 10-1 was grabbing a cable.



Well, 10-2 means "laying cable" as it were.
  • 0


Tai Audio

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Opal

CineTape

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport