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E6 processing


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#1 Glen Alexander

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 02:42 PM

From Kodak site,

The Kodak photo processing laboratory in Renens, Switzerland has been closed. Kodak continues to offer Kodachrome processing for European customers by shipping our 35mm slide film to Dwayne's Photo of Parsons, Kansas. There is no additional charge for this service.
European customers should continue to send their KODACHROME Film and mailers to the address below, as they have in the past.Kodak SA
Laboratoire KODACHROME
Case Postale
Ch-1001 Lausanne
Switzerland,
CH

Dwayne's charges .29/ft, if someone were to come along and offer more reasonable rates of .15 to .18/ft, you'd probably get quite a bit of business.

i know next may, i'll be needing about 10,000ft processed.

Edited by Glen Alexander, 30 November 2008 - 02:43 PM.

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#2 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 05:20 PM

Glen,
Kodachrome does not go through the E6 process. It has its own process which is very complicated and difficult to operate. This is why there have been very few labs over the years who have run the Kodachrome process.
Brian.
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#3 Glen Alexander

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 08:12 PM

This kit is still available here

http://www.tetenal.c...1...300000&L=UK
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 08:45 PM

This kit is still available here

http://www.tetenal.c...1...300000&L=UK


Glen, you have your head so far up your ass here it isn't even funny. . .

Did you read the 2nd post?

It ISN'T E6, it' process K-14. . .
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 09:41 PM

Kodachrome does not use modern color dye coupler technology (like E6 reversal or modern color negative film) - the color dyes are added in a complicated process later. See:

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Kodachrome
Developing process
The Kodachrome K-14 developing process is very complicated, exacting, and requires technicians with extensive chemistry training, as well as large machinery which is extremely difficult to operate. This complexity precludes its use by home amateurs or small laboratories, in contrast with the E-6 process, which is used for developing most other reversal films, and which can be performed by amateurs. In the early 1990s Kodak offered the "K-Lab" process to small labs in an attempt to increase the availability of the K-14 process, but ultimately this was not successful, with the final two K-Lab -equipped labs (Horiuchi Color in Tokyo and Kodak's own plant in Lausanne) shutting down and Kodak discontinuing the "B-I-B" (bag-in-box) K-14 chemistry required for the K-Lab.
Similar to other reversal films, Kodachrome is first developed into black and white negative layers and stopped but not fixed. Then, unlike other reversal films, the correct color dye couplers are added by performing two exact light re-exposures and a chemical "fogging" step, with development of the subtractive layers, one at a time, in between re-exposures, adding the dye couplers during each of the three individual color developments.[12]
Due to the complexity of its processing, Kodachrome was initially sold at a price which included processing by Kodak. A mailer was included with the film at the time of purchase, which the photographer used to send exposed films, slide or movie, to one of several designated Kodak laboratories, where the film was processed, mounted in 2" x 2" cardboard mounts in the case of 35 mm slides, and returned by mail to the sender. After 1954, as a result of the case United States v. Eastman Kodak Co., this practice was prohibited in the United States as anticompetitive.[13] Kodak entered into a consent decree ending the product tying arrangement in which it sold Kodachrome only with Kodak processing included, and was required to allow independent labs to acquire the chemicals and machinery needed to process Kodachrome films. Outside the United States processing envelopes continued to be included with the purchase of a roll of Kodachrome, but within the United States Kodak sold processing envelopes separately. (Kodak discontinued the production of film mailers in 2007, but will continue to honor existing mailers until at least the end of 2009.)
As the use of slide film in general declined in the 1980s and 1990s, and as Kodachrome sales in particular dropped after the introduction of Fujifilm's Velvia slide film in 1990, many Kodachrome processing laboratories, both Kodak-owned and independent, shut down in response to the greatly decreased volume of business. Since the closing of the last Kodak-owned slide processing lab in the United States in the summer of 2005, virtually all Kodachrome processing has been done by Dwayne's Photo, an independent processing lab in Parsons, Kansas. Dwayne's Photo is the last Kodak-certified K-14 lab open to the public remaining in the world, and honors all of Kodak's processing mailers for slides, per an agreement with the company. (Kodak also maintains a small, private K-14 line at their Rochester campus for testing purposes.)

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#6 Glen Alexander

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 11:19 PM

Glen, you have your head so far up your ass here it isn't even funny. . .

Did you read the 2nd post?

It ISN'T E6, it' process K-14. . .


No but do you know your ass from a hole in the ground?

read where the 'real' photographers post not wannabees like you.

http://photo.net/fil...ory=Color slide

Read about Kodachrome, Ektachrome, E-6, etc. I've even started a post about Technicolor.

In general, I'm interested in super saturated colors obviously not just E-6, but others as well as CROSS-PROCESSING.

i don't claim to be an expert on color processing so i'm allowed ask 'newbie' questions.

from Dwaynes
:
Slide Film Processing

Dwayne's offers processing for Ektachrome and other E6 process compatible films. In addition, we also offer processing for Kodachrome 35mm slide film. In fact, we are the only remaining Kodak certified processor of Kodachrome in the U.S. "

so initially i thought E-6 was the processing not K-14.

Big Thanks to D. Mullen!!

Edited by Glen Alexander, 03 December 2008 - 11:24 PM.

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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 10:30 PM

No but do you know your ass from a hole in the ground?

read where the 'real' photographers post not wannabees like you.


What is this, kindergarten?

You may be able to fool David Mullen into thinking you are actually interested in information, but when you ignore a post that says the same thing and need to have information gleamed off the internet spoon-fed to you, it leads me to question your seriousness too. . .

Are you sure you aren't another 17 y.o. kid with too much free time on your father's computer rather than an arrogant filmmaker so desperate for attention he unspools Vistavision dailies iwhile seated in a coffeehouse?
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#8 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 11:32 PM

Glen Alexander- From: Auvers-sur-Oise, France (Los Angeles temp)

A Frenchman stuck in LA.......That explains a lot, the Tofu, frozen yogurt and Sushi macrobiotic diet alone's gotta piss him off royally. :rolleyes:
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#9 K Borowski

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 11:49 PM

Glen Alexander- From: Auvers-sur-Oise, France (Los Angeles temp)

A Frenchman stuck in LA.......That explains a lot, the Tofu, frozen yogurt and Sushi macrobiotic diet alone's gotta piss him off royally. :rolleyes:


But really, what is it with this guy?

I spend hours posting answers to his out-of-the-blue, cross-threaded questions, and he turns around and launches personal attacks on me!

Well, as the saying goes, the help you go the most out of the way for is often the least appreciated.
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 03:40 AM

I spend hours posting answers to his out-of-the-blue, cross-threaded questions, and he turns around and launches personal attacks on me!


And yet you keep answering his posts........how awfully........GENEROUS....of you. :rolleyes:
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#11 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 04:37 AM

Big Thanks to D. Mullen!!


This would be the SAME D. Mullen you had this to say to on the 3rd of October:

There are those that do and make things happen like me and there are those who CAN'T like you.

They bitch and moan because they can't and don't want to believe any else can. Oh, it's too hard, well piss off, don't pop my bubble.

Other people have much more experience making things happen that are new and innovative then relying on standard techniques. Most focus pullers don't have the engineering, scientific, or mechanical background I have.

Many people have been in business for 40 years and still don't have enough to pay the rent.

Ergo, so what, 30 movies and I can't seem to recall ever seeing any of them at a cinema or dvd. Well take that back, I saw about 10 minutes of Space Farmer because I was captive on an airplane, then I turned it off and slept for 9 hours.

People like Mullen ASC can go bury your head in the sand all you want, others will see and be amazed at the cinematography and more importantly the story. If anyone is talking out of their ass, I suggest you were looking in the mirror.


You know Glen, you should REALLY try and be more polite, not everyone here is as forgiving and gracious as Mr. Mullen obviously is and it would be ashame if you needed some information one day and NO ONE felt the LEAST BIT like providing you with it. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 05 December 2008 - 04:39 AM.

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#12 K Borowski

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 04:14 PM

And yet you keep answering his posts........how awfully........GENEROUS....of you. :rolleyes:



You Steven, you are absolutely right. I am far too easily drawn into conversations with people that do not warrant a response.

But hey, you too! Shouldn't you be working on your lab/studio right now? ;-)

Hope you had a happy Thanksgiving, my man.
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#13 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 12:08 AM

But hey, you too! Shouldn't you be working on your lab/studio right now? ;-)

Hope you had a happy Thanksgiving, my man.


I am. I go get my OXBERRY Aerial Optical Printer, my Research Optics standard optical printer and my thin line splicer ( don't know who makes that but ya gotta have it for cutting anamorphic negatives) in about 2 weeks. I've also been trying to strengthen our other departments, I picked up a pair of ACmade edge coding machines so I could print dallies and use the KEM flatbeds to edit traditionally so we can save some cash. I could use the Domino to digitize everything at about 3 to 4 K but I still think it will be cheaper to print film and use the KEMs. I would like to find a Hazeltine or the somewhat more modern computer equivalent, I also need a Solitaire Cine 3 or better for filmout, but everything in it's time. I have been searching for a warehouse but so far nothing. I finally also found a guy who will go pick up all that equipment I bought from Paul at a reasonable price so that should be back here sometime in early spring. I've also been doing the most important things gathering the money for this stuff and researching, studying and learning to comprehend the complexities of motion picture processing. It's gettin' there ol' buddy, little by little. I do SOMETHING related to getting my film made everyday, even if it's just trying to learn something on this board.

As for Thanksgiving, (thanks for asking) , it was good, Christmas is turning out to be a bit of a bitch but that's what happens when you spend all your cash on film equipment instead of doing what you're suppose to do with it, but in my defense, when a super deal comes up, how ya gonna pass it up? :D

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 06 December 2008 - 12:13 AM.

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#14 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 12:33 AM

Research PRODUCTS, not research optics, sorry, I took a little cosmic trip for a moment, but I'm back now. :D
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#15 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 01:01 AM

Research PRODUCTS, not research optics, sorry, I took a little cosmic trip for a moment, but I'm back now. :D
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#16 K Borowski

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 01:06 AM

Research PRODUCTS, not research optics, sorry, I took a little cosmic trip for a moment, but I'm back now. :D


Don't worry Steven, I don't think they're in business to send their secret police after you ;-)

I oughta come down and visit your getup sometime, especially if you get a solitaire. I'm currently pondering a project that uses one on a daily basis, so maybe we could collaborate in this area.

Same with a scanner. Ever thought of modifying a used high-end still film scanner, like an HR 500 to suit your scanning needs? They're obviously designed for 8-perf. film, but I'd imaging it'd be easy enough to modify them for 4-perf., or design software to deal with this issue.
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#17 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 02:59 AM

Hey Buddy, you're welcome to come down when we're setting it up! I can use all the expert help I can get, or even just competent bodies for that matter. It should be a blast and can only help. You might be able to do a little processing while you're here.

As for converting ANYTHING that delicate, that's beyond me right now. Now say someone like Paul or Hal could do it but trust my at this point you got the wrong guy to do that. :D Besides, the reason I bought the Domino was because it would do the job and I could afford it, those HR 500s sound like even used they'll cost a fortune and that still doesn't help me with the film out.

Yeah see, here's one on Ebay right now:

http://cgi.ebay.com/...atchlink:top:us

It's 11 hundred more than I paid for the Domino and I'd still have to modify it. What's the advantage of the HR500? Will it scan higher than 4K and if so how fast is it?

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 06 December 2008 - 03:00 AM.

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#18 K Borowski

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 03:50 PM

I thought you meant you had a film-recorder. IDK what Domino scanners are like, as I've never worked with one. If you got it less than an HR, even better!
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#19 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 02:02 AM

Yeah, the Domino's a little slow, (90s technology) something like 15 seconds a frame as opposed to 6 seconds a frame from a Spirit, but hey, it also didn't cost me a quarter of a million dollars either so time we can afford to waist a little time for that much cash. :D
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#20 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 02:09 AM

Yeah, the Domino's a little slow, (90s technology) something like 15 seconds a frame as opposed to 6 seconds a frame from a Spirit, but hey, it also didn't cost me a quarter of a million dollars either we can afford to waist a little time for that much cash. :D

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 07 December 2008 - 02:10 AM.

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