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Best way to mount a Sony EX-1 to a Cessna 206


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#1 Ryan Hill

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 01:58 AM

Hello,

I'm headed to Colombia for a shoot, and the director would like me to mount a Sony EX-1 to a Cessna 206. Does anyone have any experience with this or any recommendations for someone I could speak with? Much appreciated.

Ryan
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 02:25 AM

Maybe you could ask the guys at Tyler. They make mounts for helicopters, don't see why they wouldn't know about mounting to single engine planes :/

http://www.tylermoun...frameshome.html
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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 05:26 AM

You could check with Cessna to see if there are any camera mounts licensed for use on a 206. Any camera mount has to be cleared by the aviation licensing authorities such as FAA, CAA etc.

I assume you're talking about mounting the camera on the wing strut.
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 05:51 AM

Further to previous responses, the administrative and regulatory issues associated with attaching cameras to aircraft are typically considerably more stressful than the technical work itself!

P
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#5 Martin Hawkes

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 07:07 AM

Hello,

I'm headed to Colombia for a shoot, and the director would like me to mount a Sony EX-1 to a Cessna 206. Does anyone have any experience with this or any recommendations for someone I could speak with? Much appreciated.

Ryan


Hi,

Dont think about hard mounting it. The combination of the plane´s vibrations and the rolling shutter of the CMOS chip will ruin your footage.

Good luck!

Regards,

Martin
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#6 Jim Hyslop

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 07:48 PM

You could check with Cessna to see if there are any camera mounts licensed for use on a 206. Any camera mount has to be cleared by the aviation licensing authorities such as FAA, CAA etc.


I hope "CAA" refers to a Colombian agency, not a Canadian agency. "CAA" in Canada is the Canadian Automobile Association (NavCanada is responsible for aviation matters in Canada, in case anyone's interested).

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#7 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 12:03 AM

Hi,

Dont think about hard mounting it. The combination of the plane´s vibrations and the rolling shutter of the CMOS chip will ruin your footage.

Good luck!

Regards,

Martin


Indeed, anything short of a good shock-absorbed mount will render footage acquired from a small plane pretty much useless.
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#8 Ryan Hill

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 11:38 AM

Thanks for all the advice. Finally learned that since it's a Cessna 206, you can take the back door off with no trouble and basically sit in the backseat and film out the door. Will probably put a cinesaddle in my lap to try to absorb what I can. I guess the older 206's didn't let you take the door off but most of those have been retired. Thanks again for the help. Ryan
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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 12:01 PM

I hope "CAA" refers to a Colombian agency, not a Canadian agency. "CAA" in Canada is the Canadian Automobile Association (NavCanada is responsible for aviation matters in Canada, in case anyone's interested).

--
Jim



The CAA is the Civil Aviation Authority, the British version of the FAA.

http://www.caa.co.uk/
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 01:08 AM

Yes but we're talking Columbia here, with the right palms greased, you should be able to get pretty much anything approved particularly safe or not. :rolleyes: , however since he's shooting video on a small camcorder, I was going to recommend handheld with a body strap attached to the Sony or some fabricated interior rig because something like a Tyler rig would probably cost as much in rental fees as the entire budget of the film plus I doubt whether one would even be available in Columbia.

Since he's already come to the decision to sit in the back and shoot through a door opening, the only thing I might recommend is some kind of steadicam arm connected to his body on a vest in the traditional way or to a non critical support somewhere in the backseat area and that he wear a seatbeat or harness the entire time just in case they run into any turbulence during the flight. That way both the camera and the operator would be safely held in place, the picture would be smooth and both would have little chance of being thrown out of the plane should it be buffeted by severe and unexpected winds or drafts, the kind of stuff light, single engine aircraft are vulnerable to while in flight particularly in a generally hilly, mountainous country like Columbia. Just some recommendations. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 27 December 2008 - 01:12 AM.

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#11 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 04:57 AM

Yes but we're talking Columbia here, with the right palms greased, you should be able to get pretty much anything approved particularly safe or not. :rolleyes: , however since he's shooting video on a small camcorder, I was going to recommend handheld with a body strap attached to the Sony or some fabricated interior rig because something like a Tyler rig would probably cost as much in rental fees as the entire budget of the film plus I doubt whether one would even be available in Columbia.

Since he's already come to the decision to sit in the back and shoot through a door opening, the only thing I might recommend is some kind of steadicam arm connected to his body on a vest in the traditional way or to a non critical support somewhere in the backseat area and that he wear a seatbeat or harness the entire time just in case they run into any turbulence during the flight. That way both the camera and the operator would be safely held in place, the picture would be smooth and both would have little chance of being thrown out of the plane should it be buffeted by severe and unexpected winds or drafts, the kind of stuff light, single engine aircraft are vulnerable to while in flight particularly in a generally hilly, mountainous country like Columbia. Just some recommendations. B)


Having once tried wearing a full sized Steadicam rig in a helicopter it's something I wouldn't recommend. Perhaps one of the small hand held Steadicam rigs might work, but the EX1 might be at the upper limit. The cine saddle makes sense, given that the EX1 isn't the best hand held camera in the world.

You can get away with quite a few things in third world counties, but you should be always be aware of safety when dealing with aircraft.

You should shoot in the coolest time of the day so you don't get any thermals, fortunately the light tends to be more interesting in the morning than mid day.
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#12 Robert Skates

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 12:23 PM

Door off with the camera on baby sticks with a solid head (Sachtler or O'Connor). A dutch or tango head is also a must. Keeping a level horizon can be a bit tricky. With fixed wing shooting it is really all about the flying conditions. On a calm day you can get shots that are very close to helicopter type shots. Here is link to my aerial reel. It was all done from a Piper Saratoga.
http://www.robskates.com/AERIALS.html

Another option would be the TYLER Mini Gyro. It may be better if you encounter turbulence. Here is a link to a Tyler Mini Gyro demo.
http://strattoncamera.com/tyler.html

Hope this helps.
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