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400mm 5.6 Vivitar for 42 bucks for my K3


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#1 Ira Ratner

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 07:57 PM

The worst thing about owning a K3 in M42 mount are all of these cheap lenses available on eBay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/...I...N:IT&ih=006

With my top bid of $63 and my winning price of $42, I now have the fattest and longest lens on the block--which as you know, makes me a real man, unlike the rest of you with those wimpy c-mount things. (HAH!)

At 5.6, we ain't talking speed here. So in sunny South Florida (let's assume very sunny but with tree/canopy cover here and there), can I hope to shoot 100 Plus Reversal with this lens? Or do I have to go 200 Tri? (I'm only shooting b&w reversal.)

I got this only for nature stuff, because I just know that I'll make a fortune selling stock of discarded Budweiser cans floating in the Everglades.

I guess this is a stupid question, because at this focal length, I'm going to have to really stop down for any DOF, correct? So it's Tri only?

Edited by Ira Ratner, 08 December 2008 - 08:01 PM.

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#2 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 10:42 PM

It depends how you shoot it. 100 ASA film in the sun or open shade should be OK at 24fps. 200 ASA would give you more stop for shadier areas, running the camera at 48 fps, etc.

Generally speaking the larger the F stop (5.6 to 22), and the shorter the lens, the greater the DOF, or more objects in the picture will be in focus. The 400mm 35mm photo lens will give you the field of view of 800mm in 16mm cinematography. You are talking very shallow DOF there to begin with -despite the fact that the smaller the sensor or film area, the more DOF you get. To get less things in focus (smaller depth of field) you would have to shoot 35mm, shorten your focal length of open up your stop, neither of which your set up allows for.

http://en.wikipedia..../Depth_of_field

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 08 December 2008 - 10:46 PM.

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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 10:50 PM

It won't let me edit: To get less things in focus (smaller depth of field) you would have to shoot 35mm, shorten your focal length of open up your stop, neither of which your set up allows for.

Should read: To get less things in focus (smaller depth of field) you would have to shoot 35mm, add to your focal length of open up your stop, neither of which your set up allows for.

Sorry
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