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Kodak Vision 2 and Fuji Eterna 16mm


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#1 Roger Richards

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 05:51 PM

Hi folks, I have a question about film stocks that I hope someone can help me with. I am working on a documentary film, which has some really interpretive sections, and plan to shoot primarily with Kodak Vision 2 7201 and 7205 and 500T Vision 3 stocks. I have never used the Fuji Eterna line. My thought was to use the Fuji for some situations when a softer, more painterly feel was envisioned. Anyone here who has used both and can comment on combining stocks? Is it too glaring a difference, or can it work? The negatives will be telecined to HD. Thanks!
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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 06:56 PM

Hi folks, I have a question about film stocks that I hope someone can help me with. I am working on a documentary film, which has some really interpretive sections, and plan to shoot primarily with Kodak Vision 2 7201 and 7205 and 500T Vision 3 stocks. I have never used the Fuji Eterna line. My thought was to use the Fuji for some situations when a softer, more painterly feel was envisioned. Anyone here who has used both and can comment on combining stocks? Is it too glaring a difference, or can it work? The negatives will be telecined to HD. Thanks!

There's no reason not to combine stocks when you want different looks for different segments. The HD telecine also means you'll have plenty of latitude for fine tuning the differences in post.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 10:40 PM

Sure, there is no reason why you shouldn't do it. It often is that Fuji and Kodak footage is combined, but it usually is used in different scenes.

I wouldn't necessary say that you cannot inter cut the two stocks in one scene, but unless you are going for a specific look, it could be jarring; although laymen may never know exactly why it looks jarring -or even notice it much, if at all.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 17 December 2008 - 10:41 PM.

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#4 Roger Richards

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 12:00 AM

Thanks for your help, guys, much appreciated.
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#5 Sing Howe Yam

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 06:20 PM

I shot a short this past spring on Fuji 8573 and Kodak 5218 and there was not that much of a difference. I feel a lot of the color negative stocks now are more for acquisition, sure I think there are difference between the two stocks, obviously since both of them use different technology for them but I really did not see a big difference to where it was jarring for me. It was intercut within the same scene when I used both stocks. If you go to narrative section on my website and play the short, I doubt you can tell which shot is different. I think the difference between the stocks is the whites, I feel Fuji might have a cleaner white while Kodak has a warmer tone to the white. Some color differences in the green as well, people say Kodak is warmer while Fuji leans to the cooler side.
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#6 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 06:51 PM

Right, with the advent of sophisticated color correction and telecine techniques, it will be easier to match stocks to look very much alike. Now, if one is going for a photochemical finish, that may be a totally different result.
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Opal

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Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

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Willys Widgets

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The Slider

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Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post