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Eye light (continued)


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#1 David Calson

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 06:27 PM

From what I've gathered from other topics on this, it's best if the obie light is hard. Should obie light be barned-doored/black wrapped so that it only hits the eye? How less brighter, usually, should the obie light be in relation to the key? thanks
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 06:57 PM

From what I've gathered from other topics on this, it's best if the obie light is hard. Should obie light be barned-doored/black wrapped so that it only hits the eye? How less brighter, usually, should the obie light be in relation to the key? thanks


Depends on if you are using the Obie for a key light (as it was for Merle Oberon), or a fill light, or just a reflection in the eyeball. A harder eyelight just means that it is more of a tiny point source in the eye, and it produces a harder shadow under the chin & nose, though not much of a shadow since it is just above the lens usually.

Snooting the eyelight mainly just helps keep it from spilling onto other actors or parts of the room, it's hard to snoot it enough to keep it only around the eyes, unless it is a tiny light like a Dedo with a blackwrap snoot or a projector attachment to put a strip light across the eyes. Otherwise, blackwrapping the eyelight generally just confines it to the face.
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#3 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 09:23 PM

Depends on if you are using the Obie for a key light (as it was for Merle Oberon), or a fill light, or just a reflection in the eyeball. A harder eyelight just means that it is more of a tiny point source in the eye, and it produces a harder shadow under the chin & nose, though not much of a shadow since it is just above the lens usually.

Snooting the eyelight mainly just helps keep it from spilling onto other actors or parts of the room, it's hard to snoot it enough to keep it only around the eyes, unless it is a tiny light like a Dedo with a blackwrap snoot or a projector attachment to put a strip light across the eyes. Otherwise, blackwrapping the eyelight generally just confines it to the face.


I've been thinking about lighting up a big piece of showcard behind the camera. tried it recently and it didn't work how I though it would, much like "lighting" a wine bottle.
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#4 John Brawley

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 01:35 AM

From what I've gathered from other topics on this, it's best if the obie light is hard. Should obie light be barned-doored/black wrapped so that it only hits the eye? How less brighter, usually, should the obie light be in relation to the key? thanks



I think it depends and I like what David has to say on this. Remember though, you usually want an eyelight just for the eyes, not to actually *light* the scene.

So take advantage of the mirror like surface of the eye. I've used a regular 100 or 150 dedo just above camera on the same axis as the lens. You can use the sliding dimmer to run it low enough. I usually look through the viewfinder, wave my hand in front of the dedo and dim it down till i can't see a shadow from my hand anymore. But you WILL see a ping in the subject's eye.

jb
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#5 David Tilburey

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 05:57 PM

The Litepanel Micro is a great little option for an onboard camera light. Like the dedo, it's dimmable, it's light and it will quick and easy to rig to give you that little somethin somethin.

I believe David mentioned using one onboard on "United States of Tara" - was that for prodominately eyelight?

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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 08:47 PM

The Litepanel Micro is a great little option for an onboard camera light. Like the dedo, it's dimmable, it's light and it will quick and easy to rig to give you that little somethin somethin.

I believe David mentioned using one onboard on "United States of Tara" - was that for prodominately eyelight?

daveT


Yes, as an eyelight and weak fill in a tighter close-up, especially if the camera move or position did not allow for some needed fill light to get in there.
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Metropolis Post

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Glidecam

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