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Nizo Professional Super8 Camera - remove internal filter?


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#1 Jamie Broughton

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 05:47 PM

Hi. I have a Nizo Pro Super 8 camera, which I'm keen to use to learn about cinematography.

I've already shot a wedding party (outside a church) using Kodak Ektachrome 64T, which came out pretty well in mildly sunny conditions. However, given the cut down Super8 versions of modern Fuji/Kodak film stocks you can get from the likes of Pro8mm etc., I wonder if I should get the internal plastic filter removed from the camera, so I can get the best out of them?

I'm new to shooting film, so if I do remove the filter, could somebody advise me what the main filters are that I'll need for the camera? I've been reading about neutral density and 85A and 85B ones, so I assume these are the ones referred to by the film companies? Also, is there is a basic light meter someone could recommend as well? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Jamie
London, UK
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#2 Ira Ratner

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 06:10 PM

I don't know anything about that camera, but if you have an internal filter, I wouldn't screw with it at the beginning.

Removing it is not really going to make your camera any faster, MAYBE 1/2 a stop. Plus, it might be integral to how the lens focuses.

Does that camera have a light meter and lens apertures that you can adjust? Or does it just have a setting for the ASA film you're using, and there's no way to read or adjust anything?

We'll get into the ND and 85 filters later, but first things first.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 06:11 PM

Hi Jamie.

Whatever you do DON'T buy film from Pro8mm. They have a long standing reputation for delivering defective products at rather extortionate prices, and that certainly rings true from my experiences.

All a Neutral Density (ND) filter does is cut a specific amount of light, depending of which filter use use, without affecting the colour balance. It may be wise to carry a couple of screw-on ones when you go filming, but I don't think you'll need one internally.

Also, you should probably keep the 85 filter inside the camera, as far as I know an 85B filter does the same job but cuts less light, or something like that, I'm not honestly sure.

Good luck now! :)
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#4 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 12:48 AM

Hi Jamie.

Whatever you do DON'T buy film from Pro8mm. They have a long standing reputation for delivering defective products at rather extortionate prices, and that certainly rings true from my experiences.

All a Neutral Density (ND) filter does is cut a specific amount of light, depending of which filter use use, without affecting the colour balance. It may be wise to carry a couple of screw-on ones when you go filming, but I don't think you'll need one internally.

Also, you should probably keep the 85 filter inside the camera, as far as I know an 85B filter does the same job but cuts less light, or something like that, I'm not honestly sure.

Good luck now! :)


I would leave the internal filter intact for the sake of not messing with the insides, but simply don't use it (leave your setting at the light bulb and the filter will not be in place). Then buy an 85B that you can screw on. It will deliver better results than the old plastic thing that's over 30 years old. ND filter would only be useful if you are trying to maintain a certain f-stop range. Example: you're outside and need to stop down to f-11 but you don't want all the DOF and the rest of your movie was shot at 2.8 so you stack on the neutral density to allow you to shoot at 2.8 even under bright conditions.

As for external meter, I'd use the internal one unless you have reason to believe it is not performing.

Rick
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#5 Jamie Broughton

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 03:48 PM

I don't know anything about that camera, but if you have an internal filter, I wouldn't screw with it at the beginning.

Removing it is not really going to make your camera any faster, MAYBE 1/2 a stop. Plus, it might be integral to how the lens focuses.

Does that camera have a light meter and lens apertures that you can adjust? Or does it just have a setting for the ASA film you're using, and there's no way to read or adjust anything?

We'll get into the ND and 85 filters later, but first things first.


Hi. The Nizo has a light meter inside the viewfinder, which can be set automatically, or adjusted manually by the switch on the side of the camera. The camera lense can be adjusted to various metre/feet lengths ... and it's also possible to manually use the zoom. There are no settings for the ASA film being used. From reading your post, and the other ones on this page - which are very useful, it seems my best option is to select the bulb setting so the filter is off, and use one of the 85 filters when shooting outside. I'm assuming the filter inside the camera is an 85, but I don't know how clean it is. Saying that, the camera is in really good condition, and works well. I'd be really interested to know in what situations you'd use the different filters, and which are the good makes. As Wratten are made by Kodak, I guess that would be one brand to go for? Thanks again for your help.
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#6 Matthew Buick

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 04:14 PM

I would leave the internal filter intact for the sake of not messing with the insides, but simply don't use it (leave your setting at the light bulb and the filter will not be in place). Then buy an 85B that you can screw on. It will deliver better results than the old plastic thing that's over 30 years old. ND filter would only be useful if you are trying to maintain a certain f-stop range. Example: you're outside and need to stop down to f-11 but you don't want all the DOF and the rest of your movie was shot at 2.8 so you stack on the neutral density to allow you to shoot at 2.8 even under bright conditions.

As for external meter, I'd use the internal one unless you have reason to believe it is not performing.

Rick


Well said! I think I know my place now. HEHE! :rolleyes:

Edited by Matthew Buick, 22 December 2008 - 04:15 PM.

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#7 Giles Perkins

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 04:23 PM

See;

http://onsuper8.blog...-to-filter.html

This film was shot that way;


View on Vimeo

With Pro8mm Fuji Etrena Vivid 160 and Vision 2 - it won a couple of awards!

Edited by Giles Perkins, 22 December 2008 - 04:25 PM.

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#8 Jamie Broughton

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 05:08 PM

See;

http://onsuper8.blog...-to-filter.html

This film was shot that way;


View on Vimeo

With Pro8mm Fuji Etrena Vivid 160 and Vision 2 - it won a couple of awards!


Thanks for the links. Really enjoyed watching your films on Vimeo. I especially liked the Ferryman documentary. Just out of interest, do you get your films processed and transfered to tape by Pro8mm, then?
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#9 Giles Perkins

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 05:29 PM

The Ferryman was, my other films have been a variety of telecine and processing by a range of suppliers in the UK and elsewhere including some I've done myself - I like to mix it up - all part of the fun!

Edited by Giles Perkins, 22 December 2008 - 05:30 PM.

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#10 andy oliver

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 08:55 PM

Hi, do not touch that internal filter, removing it may affect the back focus of the lens to film plane, depending on how the lens/filter was originally set up.... I'm not sure about nizo camera, but other makes, leicina special, zeiss ms8, beaulieu 4008-5008 series all have two filters, when the 85 is swung out of the film path, it is replaced by a clear filter, thus maintaining perfect back focus, which is ( i assume ) why these camera out perform all others i've ever used when the lens is wide open.

Edited by andy oliver, 22 December 2008 - 08:55 PM.

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