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Painfully New Newbie Needs Advice (Need intro ideas)


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#1 Sean Sullivan

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 04:05 PM

Hey Everyone,

I'm brand new on the board and just about as new to cinematography as I am to this board. ha ha

Well, I need some input, newbie that I am. I'm trying to put together a television show style production.

Cameras

I'm trying to purchase a camera to shoot in a wide range of light - from outdoor full sunlight to indoor lighting. I'm also putting the footage online and possibly making it available for download or DVD. Mostly, it will be on the web.

I have no idea if I should be using MiniDV, Memory Stick or HD for storage. I am leaning toward HD because it makes the most sense to me. What is the best option here?

I need to keep this as low cost as possible because I have no budget other than my own money, and I'm a pretty low-paid guy. ha ha

Editing

I have a MacBook with Intel graphics chip set. Should I run Final Cut Studio, or will an older version of Final Cut Pro or Final Cut Express work? I will need to have some titling, regular editing and what you would normally use for a television show (but to go on the web)

Going to Web

What are the best formats for a TV show on the web? I'd imagine I would want clarity on the level of Hulu.com. Does anyone know good software to stream out the video like Hulu.com does?

Thank you very much in advance. Sorry for being *painfully* new at this, but I am asking these questions to try to figure out where to even start.

Thanks for any tips.
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#2 Steve McBride

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 04:56 PM

Look into getting any 1/3" sized sensor, if you can pay for a 3x 1/3" camcorder that is obviously better since you have a sensor for each R, G, and B inputs versus one doing all three. With this size sensor you're best bet will come from a MiniDV camcorder for a cheap price. I'd look into the Canon GL series or if you want to spend a bit more money definitely go for the Panasonic DVX-100b.

I personally love FCS2 with everything it has, but in reality the only thing that it has other than the previous version of FCP is Color and some more filters and effects for each application. You can do basic color correction within FCP so you wouldn't even need Color if you're not working with hi-res video (which if you're doing this for web, you probably won't).

For output to web, look into Vimeo.com for uploading and such. It offers "high-def" which is better than your average video uploader. Also make sure you export with the h264 codec on your video.
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#3 Sean Sullivan

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 07:11 PM

Thanks, Steve.

I'll look into everything you mention. I've been on a steep learning curve with the cameras. I do understand the 3 sensor models... good advice. Thank you.

I may have some more questions after I look into all of this. An excellent post to help a newbie get started...

Thank you very much.


Look into getting any 1/3" sized sensor, if you can pay for a 3x 1/3" camcorder that is obviously better since you have a sensor for each R, G, and B inputs versus one doing all three. With this size sensor you're best bet will come from a MiniDV camcorder for a cheap price. I'd look into the Canon GL series or if you want to spend a bit more money definitely go for the Panasonic DVX-100b.

I personally love FCS2 with everything it has, but in reality the only thing that it has other than the previous version of FCP is Color and some more filters and effects for each application. You can do basic color correction within FCP so you wouldn't even need Color if you're not working with hi-res video (which if you're doing this for web, you probably won't).

For output to web, look into Vimeo.com for uploading and such. It offers "high-def" which is better than your average video uploader. Also make sure you export with the h264 codec on your video.


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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 07:24 PM

Just my two cents here, but I'd be far more concerned about tripods, lights, and other accessory equipment than a camera package or editing software.

Editing can be as complex or as simple as you want to make it.
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#5 Sean Sullivan

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 07:29 PM

Can anyone clue me in on CCD vs CMOS sensors?

Also to further my understanding of the sensors, is it better to have (qty3)x 1/5" sensors, or a single 1/3" sensor?

Thanks... and sorry for such basic questions.
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#6 Sean Sullivan

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 07:33 PM

Just my two cents here, but I'd be far more concerned about tripods, lights, and other accessory equipment than a camera package or editing software.

Editing can be as complex or as simple as you want to make it.


Hey, I'm open to any and all advice. Your 2 cents is 2 cents more than I have right now. :)

I am quite concerned about a tripod. Lighting, I am also learning, but have done some still photography. Much of the filming will be "action/adventure" type stuff. A large part of the footage will be outdoors and a small bit will be inside.

Are there outdoor lighting issues I need to address, given this is an action sports type of subject? I didn't think I'd be able to control much except shooting on days with decent natural light.

Inside, I planned to use those Home Depot halogens and maybe a diffuser/reflector type setup.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 08:04 PM

Hey, I'm open to any and all advice. Your 2 cents is 2 cents more than I have right now. :)

I am quite concerned about a tripod. Lighting, I am also learning, but have done some still photography. Much of the filming will be "action/adventure" type stuff. A large part of the footage will be outdoors and a small bit will be inside.

Are there outdoor lighting issues I need to address, given this is an action sports type of subject? I didn't think I'd be able to control much except shooting on days with decent natural light.

Inside, I planned to use those Home Depot halogens and maybe a diffuser/reflector type setup.


Home Depot halogens are a good thing. Also, IDK about your neck of the woods, but if you are near the Cord Camera chain, they used to have a bunch (as of a couple years ago) of cheap 3200K-balanced bulbs that you can screw into regular fixtures, but they are 250 or 300 W. Incandescent though, so hurry up before the friggin' socialists ban them :blink:

Tripod would all depend on the weight of your camera, but I'd highly recommend even a cheap one. For a serious tripod, look to spend a coupld hundred at least.

Also, outdoors, remember, bounce-cards or reflectors are your friends. Use them liberally.
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#8 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 08:48 PM

FWIW, I have been using Home Depot lights for the last year. They are 500w 120v. I'm not sure if these bulbs are rated less than 3200, because they appear yellowish. I recently bought a Lowell kit and noticed this difference in color temp when they were side by side. I'm looking around for new lamps and I've noticed that many are rated at 3100K. I'm not sure if that would account for the slight yellow tint. I've been shooing all black and white so color temperature isn't an issue, but if you're shooting color it will be.

Tom
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#9 K Borowski

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 09:16 PM

FWIW, I have been using Home Depot lights for the last year. They are 500w 120v. I'm not sure if these bulbs are rated less than 3200, because they appear yellowish. I recently bought a Lowell kit and noticed this difference in color temp when they were side by side. I'm looking around for new lamps and I've noticed that many are rated at 3100K. I'm not sure if that would account for the slight yellow tint. I've been shooing all black and white so color temperature isn't an issue, but if you're shooting color it will be.

Tom


Good rule of thumb is: the lower the wattage, the lower (warmer) the color temperature. Maybe a slight blue filter, but this is probably quite fixable in the color-correction stage.


This is a good point though. What are Home Depot worklights, quartz lamps?
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#10 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 09:40 PM

Lower wattage doesn't really matter for color temperature, it's more a voltage thing. For record, most tungsten bulbs you find in fixtures and the like are 2900K. Your real film lights will be right around 3200K.
They make photo-flood bulbs which are 3200K which you can buy, or you can just go with the warmer 2900Ks and time it out later on, or as Karl mentions, some 1/8 CTB can be useful.
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