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Organizing for Productions


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#1 Chad MacKenzie

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 06:12 AM

Lets say you work on different productions (example, tv commercials) and you have a production binder or just a file for each one. What what would you keep. I know you should have

- Insurance
- Permits
- Release forms
- Emergency Contact info


but what else? And how long would you hold onto this information for until you can throw it in the trash after the production is done?
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#2 Michael Collier

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 08:46 AM

Is this question coming from a production standpoint? Because I can tell you that as a DP I keep none of what you mentioned. I might keep equipment lists for each day, though I expect production to have a copy and act on their pages. I might keep an estimate sheet from the vendors I use to provide a record of what we were quoted, in case production needs to referance it to dispute any charges. It seems like your question is based around the production side, which few on this board I think would be willing to comment (I am not going to tell a plumber how to fix my toilet, I won't tell a producer how to do his job...sort of thing)

Is your question about cinematography/camera department records that need to be kept or production? Because I can tell you at the end of a production, I turn over everything I think might be relevent to production.

I do keep my production binders, but its out of superstition. I think its terrible bad luck to either 1.) throw away a production binder, or 2.) replace a production binder mid-shoot.

(as an example, I was on a pic once where I left my production binder on the grip truck after an 18 hour EXT night shoot, it was in winter, as we drove away from location the binder flew off, shattered into a million peices and was picked up by my key grip who was following the grip truck. Out of superstition I retained the peices and duct taped it back together, bending the rings to make the thing work. I still have that production binder today. It is terrible bad luck to ditch a production binder mid-way through a shoot. I take great pride in my binders that are falling apart, held together by duct tape. But then I am a man who prides himself on his home-made duct tape wallet, simply because I can get 5 wallets to a roll, but it doesn't matter because a duct tape wallet will last me at least 3 years. wow. long sidebar.)
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#3 Chad MacKenzie

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 06:13 AM

My question is for the producers,

BUT your reply was actually informative as well about not getting rid of a production binder!


I am happy to hear that you are duct tape wallet kind of guy
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 06:38 AM

I live around my Outlook inbox. It tends to be where most communication arrives by default, it's searchable, and it provides a paper trail of who said what.

P
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#5 Jim Hyslop

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 02:51 PM

Lets say you work on different productions (example, tv commercials) and you have a production binder or just a file for each one. What what would you keep. I know you should have

- Insurance
- Permits
- Release forms
- Emergency Contact info

but what else? And how long would you hold onto this information for until you can throw it in the trash after the production is done?


Keep in mind that I'm not an experienced producer, but I have learned the following from my various production courses at Ryerson University:

Basically, you want to keep a record of anything that proves you have permission to use the images and sounds that are in your production and in any behind-the-scenes stills, videos, etc. "Release forms" should include not only talent releases but location releases, deal memos, etc. Don't forget any copyright clearances for music, any brand names that are visible (presumably that's not a problem for a commercial), any copyrighted works that may be seen (which includes things like the light display on the Eiffel Tower at night!!).

Once the production has wrapped, I don't think emergency contact info is necessary. When disposing of personal information, I'd use a shredder to make sure the personal information can't accidentally fall into someone else's hands.

You should keep the binder for as long as the product is commercially viable - you never know when a network or distributor will ask to see the releases, or if someone who's in your production decides to sue.

--
Jim
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#6 Jim Keller

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Posted 05 January 2009 - 05:44 PM

I personally find it very useful to keep my daily schedules and daily reports in the archive, as I can refer back to them to know what went according to plan, what was easier than expected, and what surprised us. I don't keep it in the same file as the release forms, but after a few years the production is a blur, so I don't count on my memory to make sure I don't make the same mistakes twice.
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#7 Jesus Sifuentes

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:44 PM

Rule of thumb is to keep every single form signed including, call sheets, shooting schedule, budget etc. For the most part your 1st AD & UPM will help coordinate all the paper work for the producer.

I recently bought Gorilla Pro 4.5 http://www.junglesoftware.com/home/ which is a production software for Budgeting & Script Breakdown. Fairly decent if you are on a budget. I will be upgrading to EP Budgeting/Scheduling since that is the industry standard http://www.entertain...s.com/index.asp

The key is to always back up your digital files and make 2-3 copies of all documentation. You don't want any hurdles holding up distribution.
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Aerial Filmworks

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Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

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