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#1 Watha Suteesopon

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 01:58 AM

Hi,

Could anybody enlighten me as to why the movie or music video seen on tv screen look differently from what eyes see?

Let me explain a little bit. For example, when you see a behind-the-scene shot of a music video, the picture is so plain as what eyes see. But when we see the finish mv, the picture look contrasty and colorful. Another example is also hold true for motion's picture behind-the-scene. When you compare behind-the-scene clip and the real one, they look totally different in terms of picture mood and tone. Sometimes the "real" movie looks more vivid and have darker tone to it.

Sorry if I can't explain better. Awaiting for Y'all response.

Thanks.

Ted
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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 02:51 AM

A. Because behind-the-scenes footage that you're talking about is usually shot on prosumer video cameras in a run and gun style, whereas the actually MV or film is shot on a professional motion picture camera with expensive lenses and goes through extensive color correction in post to polish the footage for broadcast or theatrical release. Meaning there's a lot more money and time investing in making it look good.

B. Because the behind-the-scenes footage isn't necessarily exposed for the scene and is often at a different angle than the motion picture camera, meaning that the lighting which looks perfect for the main camera angle looks terrible from the BTS camera angle. The BTS cameraperson might also be exposing for the crew who is filming the scene. They're generally working in much darker lighting conditions than the lit scene, so when they're exposed properly in the frame then scene is overexposed.

Edited by Satsuki Murashige, 06 January 2009 - 02:53 AM.

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#3 Watha Suteesopon

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 03:08 AM

[quote name='Satsuki Murashige' date='Jan 6 2009, 12:51 AM' post='266893']
A. Because behind-the-scenes footage that you're talking about is usually shot on prosumer video cameras in a run and gun style, whereas the actually MV or film is shot on a professional motion picture camera with expensive lenses and goes through extensive color correction in post to polish the footage for broadcast or theatrical release. Meaning there's a lot more money and time investing in making it look good.

Wow, thank you very much for your reply. I ask this question because I am particularly impressed with the movies like Armageddon, The Rock, or Pearl Harbor, where Jerry Bruckheimer was a Director of Photography. Apart from nice color rendering, his slow motion technique is also very good.

Could you give me a couple of software used for color correction in post? I believe it is not about expensive lenses which make the picture look contrasty, different-kind-of-blue sky, noir, etc.

I really appreciate your reply.
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#4 Andrew Koch

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 05:23 AM

John Schwartzman was the cinematographer for The Rock, Armageddon, and Pearl Harbor, Jerry Bruckheimer was the producer of these movies.

The lenses absolutely have an effect on the contrast of the image. Color correction certainly is a factor. Color correction is either software based, hardware based, or a mixture of the two.

Final Cut Pro and Avid have some color correction tools as well as Adobe After Effects.

For more professional color grading, there are systems such as Scratch, DaVinci, and Lustre.

There are several others that I am leaving out, but what is more important than the software is the person who uses it. I would prefer a fantastic colorist on an average machine over an average colorist on a top of the line machine.
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