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Operating Arri 435


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#1 Matt Workman

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 01:06 PM

Hi Guys,

HNY!

I've only shot with the Arri435 a couple of times but I've gotten pretty comfortable with it. One thing that I've seen more and more of is the DOP/OP operating the camera on a fluid head by holding the mag and body.

Does anyone know the reason for this technique?

Thanks,

Matt
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#2 Serge Teulon

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 01:10 PM

Hey Matt,

HNY to you too.

I don't believe that technique is solely used for the 435. I've used it with other cameras and it was simply cause I found easier to get the feel to the move I wanted.
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#3 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 03:59 PM

I do this quite a lot too with many cameras including the 435. I prefer it to the stick, but sometimes the camera can come loose off the plate. If a Camera is Balanced and the tension is not too much it's a fine technique. to me, it's just a bit more comfortable.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 04:11 PM

I do something similar when I'm on the SR3, where I'll hold the front 19mm studio rods for pans and tilts with the mag tucked under my right hand shoulder a bit, so I kind of turn with the camera. Just the way I feel comfortable with it, ya know?
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 04:11 PM

I've done this from time to time when in a very tight space or when it's a very quick shot that doesn't need much operating and we don't have much setup time. Other than those two situations I don't do it. I also would never do it with a Red or F900 or Varicam since the batteries are what you'd be holding onto and (especially with the Red) you could cause the camera to shut down by tweaking the batteries. In my opinion there is really no specific reason to do it on a regular basis, unless you just prefer it for some reason.
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#6 Gus Sacks

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 04:16 PM

A DP my preferred 1st AC works for from time to time will keep a left hand grip on his rods at all times so he can hold onto the handle with his right hand and left on the grip. I did it once for a whip pan; it was comfy.
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#7 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 12:33 AM

I don't operate much but it seems like it might allow the op to get tighter leverage and motion with the camera...worked with a dude who opped a Moviecam in a similar fashion. He put his whole body into pans and tilts and kept it loose. Panhandles are really kinda awkward sometimes when you think about it, especially if you want a more hand-held aesthetic to your shot. Also, as an AC, I feel like wherever I put the panhandle for the DP/op, is instantly wrong and in the way no matter how I do it. :-P Heck, with the 435, you could operate that baby upside down and it wouldn't affect a thing!
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#8 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 12:51 AM

Depending on what lens one is using too. I have seen very long lens shots of mine shake with my pulse -usually only at the telecine / post stage when it is too late- and that generally is by just holding the panhandle, instead of hogging the camera. D'OH!

I usually try to keep my body away from the camera unless it is very tight space-wise or I am going for an at the hip shot or something/ Every time I get too close without needing too, I end up regretting it later.

I have seen other ops hold the camera by the rods with both hands when going hand held. If going hand held I may grab the left side rod sometimes, but I prefer putting my left hand at the base of the camera -usually where the rods meet the body, to steady it / balance it- while the right hand is at the handle.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 08 January 2009 - 12:54 AM.

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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 04:35 AM

No clue why other than someone thinks it's a comfy way to operate. I do imagine that the hand on the mag is a good controlled way to get small motions. Your arm is tucked fairly close into your body.

I always operate with a hand on the near rod and with the pan handle coming toward me and about waist height. It feels very controlled that way and I can let my body do much of the movement rather than just my arms.

Generally, more controlled motions come from more muscle groups than poorly controlled motions. Think about swinging a baseball bat with your arms vs. swinging with your arms, legs, hips, trunk, and shoulders all working together.
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