Jump to content


Photo

Lighting night scene with a torch


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Maurizio Gaimari

Maurizio Gaimari

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student

Posted 09 January 2009 - 07:07 AM

I have to light a night exterior scene and I was thinking of using a torch. I do not know what color the light is going to come up on film. I'm using a super 16mm with Tungsten 500 film.
and also would the beam of light be mono directional therefor suggest to the audience it is actually a torch that has been used? Because the script does not require that.

Many thanks for you help
  • 0

#2 Serge Teulon

Serge Teulon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London UK

Posted 09 January 2009 - 07:18 AM

Hey Maurizio,

Just because you are using a torch doesn't mean that you will get odd colours out of, say, a tungsten filament.
Most torches have focus rings on them which means that you can vary between a wide beam and a narrow beam....
  • 0

#3 freddie bonfanti

freddie bonfanti
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 315 posts
  • Gaffer
  • LONDON

Posted 09 January 2009 - 12:28 PM

yeah color temprature shouldnt be a problem, also using smoke might be an idea to enhance the beam effect
  • 0

#4 Ralph Keyser

Ralph Keyser
  • Sustaining Members
  • 120 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 09 January 2009 - 05:29 PM

Of course, in some parts of the world, a torch might mean an open flame on the end of a stick. :-)

My experience has been that flashlights tend to have a fairly low color temperature, so they tend to look a little orange/yellow on tungsten stock. It's not bad though, and you might like that look. You should also consider a test since xenon and LED lights are an option, and they have very different color temperatures than traditional tungsten bulbs.
  • 0

#5 Dan Salzmann

Dan Salzmann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Paris, France

Posted 11 January 2009 - 12:56 PM

Larger, old style torches (flashlights) can be tricked out with 12V halogen spotlight bulbs and powered by a small brick battery.
Whatever you use can be NDed, diffused or colour corrected with a small piece of gel.
  • 0

#6 Steve McBride

Steve McBride
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 239 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • New York, NY

Posted 11 January 2009 - 08:23 PM

Since where I live a torch is an open flame on the end of a stick as Ralph suggested, and everyone else is talking about a flashlight, I'll just comment on the color temp. You can always cut out gels and test them with a meter to make sure you have the right color temp, just keep adding/ removing gels until you get the right temp.
  • 0

#7 Maurizio Gaimari

Maurizio Gaimari

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Student

Posted 18 January 2009 - 09:58 AM

it was a battery powered torch I was referring to by the way :) .
Thanx for your very helpful advice.
  • 0

#8 Bob Hayes

Bob Hayes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1087 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Culver City, California

Posted 18 January 2009 - 01:35 PM

Thanks for clearing this up. I was really off base on my answer.

torch.jpg
  • 0

#9 Edmund Curtis

Edmund Curtis

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:07 PM

Are you lighting the scene with the torch mainly as your key? If so, it may be a great idea to place sections of poly (i believe its called beadbord in the usa) that the actor can shine the torch into and get a nice bounce back onto their face which will also provide quite a nice eyelight.

you'd be surprised how effective this could be and then you have the oppurtunity to bring the torch closer to the bounce or place the bounce in the best positions to get your effect

good luck
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Technodolly

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

CineLab

Glidecam

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Tai Audio

The Slider

CineLab

CineTape

Technodolly

Opal

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport