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#1 Sean Elder

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 11:52 AM

Hello all! I've been trolling through these forums for a few months gleaning all sorts of info and great tips, tricks, and techniques. I am an aspiring editor who wants to gain motion graphics and colorist skills. I have read through a few forums about the plus and minus sides of going to a film school, but one thing that I have to ask is how does going to school to gain the aforementioned skills help after you graduate? Yes I am currently enrolled in a digital film school. I know that this is a forum for jobs and the like, but that's my question in a drawn out sort of manner. How does one obtain a position as an editor in the industry. I've worked in other areas of video/film production, but have yet to gain any help in becoming an editor, just a better understanding of the production process which is awesome! Can anyone give me any insight on what I could do?
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#2 JD Burditt

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 12:26 PM

There is a bunch of information here but it is a cinematography based website.
Do you know about motionographer.com - that is the gateway to the motion design world.

An editor, motion graphics artist and colorist are three different jobs as you probably know.
It is good to have knowledge and some experience with all of them if you want to be an editor.
You can gain motion design knowledge through books, school and people you meet in the industry.
You will learn much about color management in a motion graphics or editorial degree.

What kind of editorial you want to do. Commercials? Features?
Search out all the good editorial houses and individuals who's work you respect.
Once you feel like you have a good amount of knowledge about editorial start looking for the assistant editor job with these companies and individuals.
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#3 Mike Lary

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 12:32 PM

Hi Sean,

I have friends who got assistant editor jobs right out of school. They had good editing reels, but what got them in the door was connections. Knowing someone who works at a production house who can refer you is valuable. You should build a network now, working with as many student directors as you can while maintaining a high quality level to your work. This is especially important with upper classmen because they'll graduate before you and might be well situated by the time you graduate. In the meantime you'll be generating a high volume of work from which to build your demo reel.

You could also intern for a summer. Internships can end up being worthless, though, so research that option a lot if you choose to go that way.

You might consider double majoring in Motion Graphics if your school offers it.

Best of luck.
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#4 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 01:04 PM

Hi Sean,

In regard to Motion Graphics (some might call animating), the first thing I would do is download a trial version of a motion graphics package, AfterEffects for example and go through the basic tutorials. Learn details about keyframing and keyframe interpolation, working with alpha channels, layers. Search the web for basic tutorials. Video Co-Pilot is a good one, but not knowing what your experience is, some of those may be too much too soon. Also, many if not all non linear editing (NLE) software has some form of keyframe ability. So if you have access to a NLE that might be a good place to start as well.

Like learning film for example, observe what other people are doing and think about the ways they may have achieved a certain look.

I would also agree with the previous suggestions about networking no matter what area you're interested in.

Tom
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#5 Sean Elder

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 01:23 PM

There is a bunch of information here but it is a cinematography based website.
Do you know about motionographer.com - that is the gateway to the motion design world.

An editor, motion graphics artist and colorist are three different jobs as you probably know.
It is good to have knowledge and some experience with all of them if you want to be an editor.
You can gain motion design knowledge through books, school and people you meet in the industry.
You will learn much about color management in a motion graphics or editorial degree.

What kind of editorial you want to do. Commercials? Features?
Search out all the good editorial houses and individuals who's work you respect.
Once you feel like you have a good amount of knowledge about editorial start looking for the assistant editor job with these companies and individuals.



Firstly, thanks for the link! As far as the cinematography aspect, I have worked on a few shorts, commercials, music videos and have an associate degree to work with. The thing is I want to work on features, but primarily independent features. The reason I am on cinematography.com is because I also light and shoot a good portion of the shorts I've worked on, and I also edit and color the footage. (If that gives any light to the situation.)
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#6 JD Burditt

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 03:45 PM

Firstly, thanks for the link! As far as the cinematography aspect, I have worked on a few shorts, commercials, music videos and have an associate degree to work with. The thing is I want to work on features, but primarily independent features. The reason I am on cinematography.com is because I also light and shoot a good portion of the shorts I've worked on, and I also edit and color the footage. (If that gives any light to the situation.)


I thought that might be the case but your first posting was not so clear and it says HEEEEELP, it came across as uncertainty.
I understand, you have a vision and want to get it out and the more you know about all aspects of production the easier it will be to make that happen.
I am being presumptive so don't take it the wrong way. Are you sure its not a film director you are moving towards?
The reason I bring this up is that there are many people who specalize in certian areas like editing, motion graphics and vfx and those are the people you will compete against for jobs.
I do understand learning about many aspects of production and post but when it comes to getting a job it can be difficult. Especially if you are wanting to learn multiple crafts by working for companies who specialize.

When it comes down to it its all about getting out there and doing your own thing with the resources you have.
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#7 Walter Graff

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 08:06 PM

Basically you need to try to get any position you can at an edit facility. I helped a kid out of high school find his way and now works graphics at a major facility in LA. It's about getting in the door. No one becomes an editor overnight. But the hurdle is getting in. Sending a resume will not get you work 99% of the time. Resumes out of school are useless for the most part. You need to find the name of a person (editor, owner, etc) at a facility and get their email and ask them how you can work at their place and you really have aspirations to work in post production. You'll work for free if you have to but really want some experience.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:46 AM

...Yes I am currently enrolled in a digital film school. ...How does one obtain a position as an editor in the industry. I've worked in other areas of video/film production, but have yet to gain any help in becoming an editor, just a better understanding of the production process which is awesome! Can anyone give me any insight on what I could do?


Being a student puts you at an advantage in regards to having doors and windows open to you to gain experience and make good connections. Consult with your instructors and see what kind of internships are available to you. Keep your ear to the ground and jump on any opportunity to intern or work at the bottom of the totum pole. I know editors are always looking for people to do log their footage, so I'd put a word out to all the listed editors in your area. I've sent out a few "cold emails" in my day, and had some great responses. There's no shame in shaking the tree a little.
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Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

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Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Opal

CineTape

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC