Jump to content


Photo

Lighting the inside of a stationary car placed outside. (Rain, grey skies, morning)


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Oskar Arnarson

Oskar Arnarson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 18 January 2009 - 01:35 AM

Hi everyone, I'm new on here and just recently started film school. Lighting isn't my strong side yet so I was wondering if you could give me any tips on how to light a car.

- It's the inside of a stationary car
- This will be shot far away from any houses (electricity)
- I want to have it raining. Would a water can work? :) If I'm not far from a lake?
- The weather here in Iceland is something like this nowadays: http://www.noaura.co...s/09/ttoa02.jpg - so probably gray skies.
- There might be snow, I don't know because it's constantly changing.
- Will be shot in the morning / daytime
- It's a horror scene
- one driver and one backseat passanger (a little girl)
- the windows will be steamy (any tip to get them to constantly blur from steam, even a few seconds after you wipe the moist off?)
- Will be shooting on a sony PMW-EX1 plus I hope to be using a DIY DOF adapter. I know this will effect the light that the camera picks up but I figured that would be okay for this rather creepy scene. I really want to achieve a shallow focus for this scene.

Just wanted to know what would be good for this. With minimal cost. I could borrow lights from school but the electricity is a problem.

For now I figure I could maybe shine a little blue light from the gauges in the car. Maybe a little green from the CD player. Kind of hard to see in daylight maybe. I wonder what I could put in the ceiling to emulate the car's top light. Somewhere I saw someone suggest fairy lights. Would it work in daylight?

I intend to use a small, bright white light behind the actors heads for backlighting. But please tell me if I'm talking out of my ass. I don't have a lot of experience with lighting, that's why I'm hoping to get tips.

Thanks a lot.

Edited by Oskar Arnarson, 18 January 2009 - 01:39 AM.

  • 0

#2 Jens Langen

Jens Langen

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 January 2009 - 01:36 PM

Hi,
I come from a still photography background, but there are some powerful rechargeable flashlights
available now at most hardware stores. You can clamp them, snoot them, put gels on, and bounce them into
cards attached to the car interior. Don't know how long they last, but they're not that expensive. They might
even run and charge at the same time off the car's battery.
Good luck!
Jens
  • 0

#3 Jamie Metzger

Jamie Metzger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 773 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco

Posted 18 January 2009 - 03:44 PM

Im thinking that if you are shooting in the morning, with overcast/cloudy skies and you need the windows to be steamed up; you are going to have a very low contrast image. Is that what you are going for? Do you want more/less contrast?

Also, don't think that you have to use lights. If the scene works with available light, then go for it!
  • 0

#4 Dean Werner

Dean Werner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Director

Posted 18 January 2009 - 05:26 PM

A water can could work for rain on the window being shown, might be hard to make it look like it's raining off in the distance. Steam, figure out which temperature controls in the car ( AC or Heat) make the windows fog up based on the outside weather. For lighting the push button, stick on lights they sell could work. If you're going to use the light from the gauges inside the car in the day time, get some glow sticks. Place them inside the dash or close to the actor to look like it's from the dash. Find orange ones for the top light. But shooting in the day light might be harder to light for this than just shooting at night.

Good Luck
  • 0

#5 Chris Newman

Chris Newman

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 January 2009 - 06:03 PM

Affordable (<$100) AC power inverters that will give you 120 VAC power are available rated up to 400 Watts, although my cheap 400 Watt one can only drive 150 Watts reliably. Still, this should be enough to provide a little directional light. Put diffusion and Color Temperature Blue gels on the light. You could also try covering one or two windows on one side of behind the camera to see if it helps give some depth to the actors' faces. If you have access to enough Neutral Density gel, you might want to line the outside of the windows behind the actors so the windows won't blow out as harshly vs. the actors.

Both the car's heater and A/C will reduce the fogging on the windows, so don't use those. Just spread a bunch of wet towels around inside. Also, if you have an AC inverter, a humidifier that sprays a cool mist might help, and you can aim it at the window you care about.
  • 0

#6 Oskar Arnarson

Oskar Arnarson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 21 January 2009 - 01:16 AM

Thank you all so much for your input. Your advice has helped! Thanks!
  • 0


Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

CineTape

CineLab

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

CineLab

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Opal

Glidecam

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport