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#1 shady chaaban

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 12:33 PM

hello everyone,

i was wondering how could i do something as described later with the most basic equipments possible (= home made motion control- no use of high speeds..) shot on video (miniDV)

so the scene is somehow like this :

track - back while a man walks towards the camera the a car hits him from the right side of the frame. afterward everything is in slow-motion : the man bumps and head towards the car front glass and breaks it then falls on the seat. the camera follows his movements (lateral) then enters from the window to end in a close shot on the man's face. NB: the glass particles are flushed all over in the car and we see on the man's face blood appearing from scratches...
so is this possible ?
it is pretty much like in "revolver" but different camera movements.

hope i made myself clear
thanks in advance
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#2 James Martin

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 12:24 PM

I hate to be blunt, but with no budget, forget it.

To do this to the level you probably have in your head, you would need stunt guys, cameras which can control speed etc etc...

To get you on the right track though, BRICK was shot for a very low budget ($250,000) and they used slow camera speeds (3fps or so) to do some of the stunts at perfectly safe speeds, then speeding up in post.

The problem with slow motion is this sort of stuff needs to happen at normal speed, then is slowed down. They could do this stuff in revolver because they had the money to do it and the people to do it.

One of the tricks of being new is working out how to do this stuff for cheap... but sometimes it just isn't possible. Think of another way to show the accident, which you can do with what you got ;)

Good luck!
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#3 shady chaaban

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 02:21 AM

yeah i know it seems impossible with restricted budget ... i just thought maybe there are ways to trick it though ...
thanks anyways :)
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 02:45 AM

you COULD do it if you can find someone with the right software and the expertise to use it. I think the newer versions of Lightwave and Maya (among others) will allow you to layer facial textures and clothing over a wireframe body fairly easily if you know what you're doing. You can create the wireframe and textures from digital photos, then use some match moving software to put your digital actor into the scene with the actual car. The wind shield could be digital as well so when the man bumps and head towards the car front glass and breaks it, the virtual wind shield glass is controllable. The close shot on the man's face with face blood appearing from scratches could be a cut with the actor in makeup with a little latex and a squeese bulb with tuubes, taking it from the virtual actor ,bouncing back against the seat and digital glass particles flying all over in the car layered in. For a little digital film, it should work OK.

You DO know this exact scene was done in Shoot 'Em Up except the guy shot the window out of his car and a van headed straight at him, unbuckled his seat belt, they collided head-on and he flew through the open space of the van's wind shield, landing in the back of the van and shooting all the bad guys in the van, right? (I LOVE that movie!!)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 22 January 2009 - 02:50 AM.

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