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Laser Rangefinder


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#1 Brian Nelligan

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 01:53 PM

I'm shopping around for a laser rangefinder and I'm looking at the BOSCH DLR165 and the Hilti PD 4, does anyone have any experience with either brand or model? I've read plenty of reviews but I wanted to see how these performed when used for getting focus marks. Since neither of these models have a viewer I know they will not be ideal for bright outdoor locations.

I'm also open to suggestions for other laser rangefinders, but my budget is under $200, most of the shoots I work on are low budget.

Thanks for any advice,
Brian
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#2 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 02:00 PM

I've been using a Hilti rangefinder (forget the model, $350-400 range) for a while now and love it. Can't speak as to the quality of the Bosch. You'll find yourself using this everyday, and upgrading to one with a visual sight as soon as you can…
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 02:24 PM

Of those I would get the Hilti. I tried out several different makes and models and the hiltis seemed to give the fastest dependable readings, and they do it live rather than pressing a button and holding still for a second and then getting a number.
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#4 David Auner aac

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:41 PM

I'm also open to suggestions for other laser rangefinders, but my budget is under $200, most of the shoots I work on are low budget.


Hi Brian,

forget everything in that price range. Save some more bucks and get a Leica Disto A5 or the Hilti PD32 (IIRC). The cheaper ones are just not good enough and unusable outside or under bright conditions. And forget those red glasses too, they're next to useless!

Regards, Dave
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#5 Mike Thorn

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 05:03 PM

Brian,

I bought a Stanley FatMax on ebay this year for $50. It's great for indoor stuff, but it's not strong enough for outdoor work sometimes, especially in direct sunlight. But, it's a fast, cheap solution. I bought it to determine if it would be useful, with the intent of upgrading if necessary.

If you want to try it out, I'd be happy to let you borrow it for a while. I don't have any shoots coming up soon that I'll need it for.
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#6 Brian Nelligan

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 01:58 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies! I think I'll look around a little more.
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#7 John Waterman

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 12:30 AM

Brian,

I own a Leica DISTO A3, and enjoy it. The A3 was around $300 when I bought it. I'd recommend checking out Leica's other distance meters too:

http://www.leica-geo...er/lgs_5061.htm
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#8 Marque DeWinter

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 07:35 PM

Brian,

I own a Leica DISTO A3, and enjoy it. The A3 was around $300 when I bought it. I'd recommend checking out Leica's other distance meters too:

http://www.leica-geo...er/lgs_5061.htm



I too am also looking for one but my budget is more around $600... How does the leica operate? Is it the same continuous readout as the Hilti? I was leaning toward the Hilti but didn't even know Leica made them...

thanx,
Marque DeWinter
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#9 John Waterman

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 08:43 PM

The Leica Disto A3 is very simple. It has an on/distance button, and when you press it once the A3 sends out the laser. A second press it takes a measurement and displays the reading. If you hold down on the on/distance button it will switch to continuous read-out mode. When in continuous read-out mode it will display the current distance value along with the longest value and shortest value as you sweep the laser around. It can display both feet and meters, and do simple add/subtract/area/volume. The A3 runs off of two AA batteries, is quite small and yet still rugged. The A3 is a class 2 laser.

The next step up, I think it is called the A5, adds a built in 2x sight for taking measurements in bright daylight. I have been very pleased with the A3, there is even a setting to disable the BEEP when you take a measurement, so it is less distracting to cast and other crew. Sometimes I do wish I had gone up and gotten the built in sight, but the A5 is larger too, so I went with the A3.

I hope that helps you. I think that Leica are the original developers of the laser measuring technology. I worked with a seasoned 1st AC out of Dallas who had one of the first laser measurement tools, and it was a leica.
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#10 Mike Thorn

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 10:50 PM

The only thing left to make them perfect would be to add an IR laser option, so you could use continuous-readout mode during a take (film only, obviously).
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#11 Hercules Fu

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 01:02 AM

Since I never use a bosch's meter,I can only leave comments on Hilti and Leica
I got a Hilti PD42 and a Leica A3, comparing in the responsing speed, i would suggest you to buy Hilti's stuff
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#12 casey clayton

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 04:10 PM

The Leica Disto A3 is very simple. It has an on/distance button, and when you press it once the A3 sends out the laser. A second press it takes a measurement and displays the reading. If you hold down on the on/distance button it will switch to continuous read-out mode. When in continuous read-out mode it will display the current distance value along with the longest value and shortest value as you sweep the laser around. It can display both feet and meters, and do simple add/subtract/area/volume. The A3 runs off of two AA batteries, is quite small and yet still rugged. The A3 is a class 2 laser.

The next step up, I think it is called the A5, adds a built in 2x sight for taking measurements in bright daylight. I have been very pleased with the A3, there is even a setting to disable the BEEP when you take a measurement, so it is less distracting to cast and other crew. Sometimes I do wish I had gone up and gotten the built in sight, but the A5 is larger too, so I went with the A3.

I hope that helps you. I think that Leica are the original developers of the laser measuring technology. I worked with a seasoned 1st AC out of Dallas who had one of the first laser measurement tools, and it was a leica.


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