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#1 Andrew Ryan

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 09:02 PM

I've read about being careful with underexposing dark skinned actors but what about overexposing? Do you have to overexpose more for an effect that a light skinned actor? For example if I'm overexposing caucasian skin 2 stops for an effect to I have to overexpose darker skin more?

My second question rises from a problem on a shoot I recently had. I was shooting in strong backlight and had about a 4 stop difference between the background and the front of my subject which was in shadow from the sunlight hitting behind. I was shooting on 250D. I underexposed the wide shots and CU's about a 1 1/3 to compensate. Is this to much?

Thanks In Advance
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 09:36 PM

I've read about being careful with underexposing dark skinned actors but what about overexposing? Do you have to overexpose more for an effect that a light skinned actor? For example if I'm overexposing caucasian skin 2 stops for an effect to I have to overexpose darker skin more?

My second question rises from a problem on a shoot I recently had. I was shooting in strong backlight and had about a 4 stop difference between the background and the front of my subject which was in shadow from the sunlight hitting behind. I was shooting on 250D. I underexposed the wide shots and CU's about a 1 1/3 to compensate. Is this to much?

Thanks In Advance


That all sounds right.

When a landscape or subject is backlit, how much you expose for the shadows versus the highlights depends on the look you want, but generally it would be rare to expose for the shadows fully at "key" levels unless the backlight was so low as to be just a tiny halo / edge and the majority of the image is in shadow. But when the sun is a little higher and the backlight is "toppy" then you may have to split the difference more between the highlights and shadows.

But I find as a general rule that underexposing a stop, stop and a half, for faces in backlight generally works.
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