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POV of a soccer ball getting kicked against a wall


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#1 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 06:31 AM

The title of the post says it all. Is this a job for some kind of bungi rig or...
Should add that this is in 35mm.
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 06:41 AM

The title of the post says it all. Is this a job for some kind of bungi rig or...
Should add that this is in 35mm.


Is this the ball's POV?
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#3 Tim Partridge

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 07:17 AM

I'd use a fish eye/distorted wide lens for the POV, and I'd film a pull back of the wall (boom/jib/steadicam- whatever works and is afffordable) and then reverse it in post so it's slamming it. I'd shoot at lower fps for faster movement too.

Reading your post initially I imagined the ball flying over the pitch, thinking of Skycam (as used in the first Highlander film).
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#4 Bob Hayes

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:00 AM

Use a Steadicam. Mount the ball to a zoom motor so it can spin. mount the zoom motor to the steadicam so the ball is in the bottom of your frame. Spin ball and run at wall.
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#5 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:55 AM

Another idea: What about using a 3D ball. One can also set up a 3D "scene" where a nice shadow will fall on the wall as the ball approaches it. It's not film, but you will have more control over the ball and shadow. So you would just pretend that the camera is following an invisible ball. Just another take on it. If you prefer to stay with film that's certainly understandable.
At the very least I might film that plate just as a back up.

Tom

Edited by Tom Hepburn, 26 January 2009 - 09:59 AM.

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#6 Serge Teulon

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:55 AM

Interesting......I wonder whether the same technique that Deakins applied with the bowling ball in The Big Lebowski?

Youtube'd some football (soccer) commercial and none of them have employed that trick.
I wonder whether it is possible to make it realistic?
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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:12 AM

We tracked "with" a tennis ball in a short comedy film and green screened in the spinning ball. Somewhat stylised, but it worked.

As has been suggested, a Steadicam could be used.
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#8 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:25 PM

The thing with the ball on a zoom motor is that it would look too much like it is spinning on a single axis.
Basically there is an establishing shot of a little kid kicking the ball off different walls in an alley.
Trying to find a way of getting a low angle shot where the camera looks like it is rebounding - bouncing off the walls.
Would like to get the feeling of the initial impact of the foot followed by a bit of spin then the jolt of the impact on the wall.
Maybe some kind of small rollover head.
I'd like to stay away from CGI on this if possible.
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#9 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:31 PM

The thing with the ball on a zoom motor is that it would look too much like it is spinning on a single axis.
Basically there is an establishing shot of a little kid kicking the ball off different walls in an alley.
Trying to find a way of getting a low angle shot where the camera looks like it is rebounding - bouncing off the walls.
Would like to get the feeling of the initial impact of the foot followed by a bit of spin then the jolt of the impact on the wall.
Maybe some kind of small rollover head.
I'd like to stay away from CGI on this if possible.
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#10 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 29 January 2009 - 04:11 PM

In 'Drive, He Said', written and directed by the guy who wrote 'The Trip' and 'Head', the Monkees movie, A POV of a basketball going through a hoop was done by putting a camera, probably a GASP, in a styrofoam ball.
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#11 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 05:17 AM

What is a GASP?
Filming the rebound off the wall off the wall in a convincing way is what's got me a bit stymied.
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#12 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 11:29 AM

I hope this shot makes your movie sell! :)

I have no advice...sorry
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#13 Onno Perdijk

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 04:08 PM

Hello Dan,

Rig the camera in frame-box or similar. Get a steelwire from a (as high as possible) riggingpoint where you can hang the box in as a pendular. Attach a steelwire (as a full stop) from the box to the opposite wall preventing the box to hit the wall. Use some bunghycords along the safety-wire to slowdown your movement on impact and give the camera the direction of filming the (not) impact....

my 2 cents.

Onno Perdijk
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#14 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 02:58 PM

What is a GASP?
Filming the rebound off the wall off the wall in a convincing way is what's got me a bit stymied.


Sorry. GSAP 16mm Gun Sight camera.
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