Jump to content


Photo

Television Light Reflecition on actor's face


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 justinmaynard

justinmaynard

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Electrician
  • Tupelo, MS

Posted 27 January 2009 - 12:28 PM

So I have a shoot coming up where an actress is sitting in front a sonogram screen. I was thinking of lighting her face with a keno diva since it is dimmable and i can make subtle changes in the level. Any advice on lighting this gag... gels, etc...

Edited by justinmaynard, 27 January 2009 - 12:29 PM.

  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 27 January 2009 - 01:29 PM

The flicker in my reel (on website) was a 300W arri fresnel 1/4 CTB and 216 on a dimmer and maybe like 7 ft or so away on 7218 I believe. just my own proven way of doing it
  • 0

#3 Elie Kamal

Elie Kamal
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 24 posts
  • Other
  • Beirut,Lebanon

Posted 27 January 2009 - 05:22 PM

well there are a couple of techniques that i use. i cannot say which works best for you. i guess you have to try them because it depends on the level you're looking for, effect and mood.
1-using a kinoflo, placing different banks (tungsten and daylight and gelling some) and switching from bank to bank randomly and sometimes switching from 2feet to 4feet. this effect will change the color temp of the light and intensity.
2- using a kinoflo, just close and open the barn door randomly. this will not affect the color temp (unless u place different bulbs on the other side so they would be the only light left when u close the barn door), but will affect exposure.
3- using a video projector connected to a dvd player or tv:
3a- defocus the projector and aim it at your talent (defocus so you don't have the images projected on your actor)
3b- bounce the projector onto a foam board or shine it through a diffusion.

well, i bet there are plenty of techniques out there, i guess you have to try and find your own preference.
Good Shooting!
Elie Kamal
  • 0

#4 David Rakoczy

David Rakoczy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1579 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • USA

Posted 27 January 2009 - 05:32 PM

Using Adrian's method, add a couple more lights (buddied up together ) with different colored Gels and kick them on now and them.. changing color temps is very prevalent in TV ambiance. Watch a TV Flicker in someone's window.. preferably your own so you are not arrested. I use a combination of soft boxes with various Gels all on 'hand squeeze' dimmers.
  • 0

#5 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19760 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 January 2009 - 07:14 PM

You'd think there wouldn't be much variation in the glow from a medical sonogram screen since it is not showing "edited" footage from a movie, with dramatic light changes.
  • 0

#6 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 27 January 2009 - 07:19 PM

That's quite a good point, David, perhaps a good reference would be looking at the Fox show "House," as they have a lot of monitors from CAT scans/sonograms etc, see how they do it.
  • 0

#7 Walter Graff

Walter Graff
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1334 posts
  • Other
  • New York City

Posted 27 January 2009 - 07:39 PM

You'd think there wouldn't be much variation in the glow from a medical sonogram screen since it is not showing "edited" footage from a movie, with dramatic light changes.


Guess you never had a baby. :) The screen (older version) shows contrasts of white to black as it scans. The harder they press the more white appears on screen as the reflection of sound creates more image. There is considerable change in the luminance of the screen as a result. The newer 4D models are color but really like sepia tone for the most part with shadows to differentiate depth and seem to glow the same regardless.

Here's an old style sonogram although contrast is not represented as well as in reall life.

http://www.metacafe....ogram_04_12_08/


Here is 4D

http://www.layyous.c...eoclips/4d2.htm


I'd go with the kino as it will give you the options and feel you need for such a scene.
  • 0

#8 Elie Kamal

Elie Kamal
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 24 posts
  • Other
  • Beirut,Lebanon

Posted 28 January 2009 - 10:26 AM

sitting in front a sonogram screen

well i didn't pay attention to that part and i just thought you were talking about a tv screen effect (topic title)...Sorry!
  • 0

#9 J. Lamar King

J. Lamar King
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 764 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 07 February 2009 - 09:04 PM

I usually use one or two 750 zips with diff and gels run through a magic gadget for a TV effect.
  • 0

#10 David Rakoczy

David Rakoczy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1579 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • USA

Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:59 AM

You'd think there wouldn't be much variation in the glow from a medical sonogram screen since it is not showing "edited" footage from a movie, with dramatic light changes.



That'll teach me to not respond to a thread title before reading the actual post.. I saw television.. not medical monitor... :huh:

Adrian is right on... thanks David. As J. Lamar said.. 750 zips are great sources to begin with.
  • 0

#11 Jake Iesu

Jake Iesu
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney, Australia

Posted 21 February 2009 - 05:06 PM

If you have time do a quick test to see what works for you.
When I lit this situation I had no time or budget, The solution for me which worked very convincingly
was to set up a 2 foot by 4 foot kino flo with both the gaffer and myself waving different blue, green
red yellow and ND gels in front of the light at random intervals. We occasionally waved 2 together
to muddle the temperature and the intensity. Quick and Effective, I would not hesitate on doing it again
if presented with this situation again.
  • 0


Technodolly

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products