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Film Stock Numbers?


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#1 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:02 PM

Kodak uses numbers to donate what film stock you are ordering. What is the difference between, for example, 5201 and 7201. Would this mean 5201(16mm) and 7201(35mm)? But this still does not make sense to me because you would have to say whether you wanted super16 or super35, and this would not include super8mm stocks either.

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:03 PM

Super35 or Super16 (unless you somehow get saddled with 2R 16mm stock) have nothing to do with the stock, but how the images is recorded onto that stock by the camera.
Also 52 denotes 35mm film for kodak, and 72 is 16. So, 7201 is 16mm 50D, whereas 5201 is the same stock 50D, in 35mm size.
The super this or that has to do with lens centering and the film gate of your camera system.
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:26 PM

Kodak uses numbers to donate what film stock you are ordering. What is the difference between, for example, 5201 and 7201.

the system goes back to the early days of Kodak, and the first two digits not only give the relative size but also the film base and the product line (motion picture, industrial, still camera, etc.) As others have said, 52 is 35mm or larger Motion picture negative , 72 is 16mm or SMALLER MP negative, so your super 8 would have a 72xx number. A stock like 5302 is for lab use and 35mm or larger.

Note that a stock that is 35mm wide, but is used for making 16mm prints may have the 16mm stock number. (35mm perfed 32/16mm )

The ystem probaly made more sense in the 1930s when they started to use it.
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#4 Evan Andrew John Prosofsky

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:54 PM

Super35 or Super16 (unless you somehow get saddled with 2R 16mm stock) have nothing to do with the stock, but how the images is recorded onto that stock by the camera.
Also 52 denotes 35mm film for kodak, and 72 is 16. So, 7201 is 16mm 50D, whereas 5201 is the same stock 50D, in 35mm size.
The super this or that has to do with lens centering and the film gate of your camera system.

I thought there was a difference. 16 has sprocket holes on both sides, whereas s16 only has them on one side, allowing for a larger recordable negative area. Thus I presumed you would need to specify what you want. Am I wrong in this belief?
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 10:09 PM

Most 16mm stock these days is 1R, or has 1 set of perfs on it. 2R stock from Kodak and Fuji is special order. By default it's all 1R as far as I know. Also, most cameras 16mm or super16mm only have 1 pulldown claw, with a few exceptions, most notably in older cameras or highspeed cameras.
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#6 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:08 AM

Kodak have been fairly consistent over the years with their stock numbers; one of the odd ones was 35mm Plus-X negative which for many years was 4231.
In general the first figure indicates the type of base and width. Super 8 is included in the 16mm range and 70mm and 65mm come under 35mm.

1=35mm nitrate
2=35mm polyester
3=16mm polyester
5=35mm acetate
7=16mm acetate

The second figure indicates negative type emulsion and 3 indicates positive type emulsions.

7302 = 16mm Fine grain Release Positive
5234 = 35mm Fine Grain Duplicating Negative
1355 = 35mm Nitrate Duplicating Positive
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