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#1 Andrew Aiello

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:04 PM

I am doing color correctioin I shot on an HVX200 at 1080. We're using Avid to do the coloring and I have a question about monitors. I am afraid to do the correction on the DELL computer monitor that we have just because I'm afraid I can't calibrate it properly. Unfortunately, however, the only proper monitor I have is a standard def SONY monitor. I calibrated the monitor, but it looks completely different. Is there an issue with correcting HD footage on an SD monitor? Is there any way to make this combination work? Appreciate any takers. Thanks
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:09 PM

The SD monitor will be showing you the wrong color space... SD colorspace is not HD. You'll need to calibrate your dell monitor, but even then it won't be ideal, you can try to work off of the vectrascopes in Avid if you'd like. . .but if you really want accuracy, more than likely you'll have to pay for at a post house or with the proper monitors.
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:48 PM

Vectorscopes.

And they're of little use in the moment to moment knowledge of whether something's going to look OK after filmout, or whatever.

P
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 08:50 PM

That's what i get for not spell-checking.

All of this too, I should add, is assuming you're not doing a film out but I have found the scopes to be helpful (or rather more helpful than a computer monitor alone).
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#5 Marque DeWinter

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:19 PM

That's what i get for not spell-checking.

All of this too, I should add, is assuming you're not doing a film out but I have found the scopes to be helpful (or rather more helpful than a computer monitor alone).


Spend the few hundred and get an actual monitor calibration system...the time alone it will save will pay for itself.

~Marque
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#6 Andrew Aiello

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 01:59 AM

appreciate the responses. unfortunately it's not my personal project and the director does not have the funds. granted you shouldn't really try to do things unless you have the proper tools, but i'm just trying to do the best i can. i found a way to calibrate a dell computer monitor pretty well, the problem is i'm trying to figure out if i should calibrate the bars that i can generate through avid or if i should just use the bars that come up in the dell calibration menu. any ideas?

thanks again
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#7 Walter Graff

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 07:47 AM

appreciate the responses. unfortunately it's not my personal project and the director does not have the funds. granted you shouldn't really try to do things unless you have the proper tools, but i'm just trying to do the best i can. i found a way to calibrate a dell computer monitor pretty well, the problem is i'm trying to figure out if i should calibrate the bars that i can generate through avid or if i should just use the bars that come up in the dell calibration menu. any ideas?

thanks again



SMPTE bars are smpte bars so if both are smpte bars it matters not which ones you use. If you have a wratten filter you can use that to observe teh screen and make adjustments. Scopes can certainly tell you a lot about exposure and the like but they alone can not be used for color correction although need to be used in conjunction with a monitor. But perhaps the $100 for a spyder calibrator might be good for this project and others down the road?
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#8 John Sprung

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 02:09 PM

unfortunately it's not my personal project and the director does not have the funds. granted you shouldn't really try to do things unless you have the proper tools, ...


Eyeballing bars is not a gold standard, it's more a pretty good ballpark thing. For screenings, I've had DP's tweak things after we set up to bars. Trying to do the best you can with no money, select a few shots from your previous work, maybe just bring in your reel, and load stuff you know well onto the system you'll be using. Then set the monitor up to those images. I know that's far from ideal, but it's probably the best way to go for zero cost.




-- J.S.
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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 02:33 PM

John's suggestion can be very useful given that there's no money for other standards. While I haven't had a great depth of experience in modern post facilities, I do recall back 25 years or so when the local TV stations would end up using a known, dependable source of video (often exterior scenes with lots of color and/or including chip charts) to do the final tweaks. IIRC it had to do with losing judgment on the color bars. If you look at them for long enough, those solid blocks of color can goof with the retinas. So, the engineers would do a bars visual, a vector scope, then tweak to a known source of video. It's weird how a screen can deliver perfect bars but still not look right with a good source. Maybe, one of the more technically knowledgeable members can offer why screen blended colors yield different tweak decisions than bars. My point being, while judging by eye isn't a precise method, it may be close enough depending on your skill at it. I emphasize- "depending on your skill". The more you do it, the better you'll get.
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