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rem-jet backing


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#1 Guillaume Vallee

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 08:51 AM

I'm trying to cross-process (with hands in buckets) some Kodak negative stock with the E-6 process but i've got some problems with the rem-jet backing. Does anybody have a trick to remove this backing ? I've got a formula that is supposed to work.

PREBATH (PB-2)Recipe (for 2L of working solution):
Start with 1.5L of water
1. Anti-Calcium No. 4 – 2ml
2. Borax (decahydrate) – 40g
3. Sodium Sulfate (anhydrous) – 200g
4. Sodium Hydroxide (aka Lye, Caustic Soda) – 2gOr Sodium Metaborate (aka Kodalk balanced alkali) – 20g
5. Water to make 2L

But even with this formula, I wasn't able to get rid of the backing.
Thanks a lot :)
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#2 Paul Bruening

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 05:32 PM

It is normally removed in a continuous processor. The film is transported at a regular speed through a series of tanks. The remjet removal tank will use a mix of circulation and agitation. It is possible to rig jets of water to do the job. But, little spinning brushes (agitation through direct yet soft contact) usually are employed, submersed with the film in the appropriate tank. It does require a high degree of water replacement to prevent particle carry over. The brushes are a special type.

Though I am no expert, I can't think of any way to remove the backing by a simple dunking method. If you come across a chemical that can do the job from simply a dunk, many of us would be very interested.
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#3 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 07:33 PM

The Kodak kit pre-bath is pretty cheap too. Sure you get a lot, but it doesn't cost much. Usually if you dunk film in the kodak pre-bath, then are able to flush the film with running water the rem-jet will wash off easily.
Anyway, what temperature did you have your prebath at? It would be more effective if it was at temperature (I'd use the e6 first developer temperature you are using).

But you can easily remove the rem-jet after the processing. Yes, you will end up with some rem-jet in the chemistry. When I have cross processed ecnII films using e6 chemistry in a Lomo tank I do so as the final use of that batch of chemistry. Then, after processing, you can pretty easily scrub the remaining rem-jet off using a soft cloth. I have often done this by putting the rem-jet film in a bucket of warm wather, then slowly pull the film into a second bucket with the back of the film rubbing against a cloth as it goes. Can be a two person job.
You can also do this after washing off the first developer and before going on with the rest of the process. You can do this in the light and it wont affect the film at all. This would save getting rem-jet in the rest of the chemistry. You can then filter the first developer by putting it through a very fine cloth. That works fine too, especially if you are talking about bucket processing and aren't after a hollywood result.

As for cross processing ecnII film in e6, I found I got the best results by under rating (ie 'over' exposing) the ecnII film by 2 stops (ie 200t I rated at 50 asa) and then push processing the e6 process by 2 stops. This is necessary to get contrast out of the ultra low gamma ecnII films. It gives a nice golden hued result.
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 09:10 PM

Though I am no expert, I can't think of any way to remove the backing by a simple dunking method. If you come across a chemical that can do the job from simply a dunk, many of us would be very interested.


Last time I played with home processing ECN-2, I was able to use a "celulose Photo sponge" to get the backing off at the end of the process. You have to be careful as some of the black stuff will transfer to the sponge through the perfs and that may get on the emusion where it is rumored to be almost imposible to remove.

Post processing removal of course leaves bits of black in all the solutions.
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#5 Simon Wyss

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 10:24 PM

The main problem is that the non-hardened backing gelatin will flake off the film but must not come in contact with the pictorial layer. Once gelatines merge you cannot even think of trying to separate the unwanted from the wanted. I think it'll be best to remove the black backing after the process by some kind of damp method, not wet-wet. You'll have to try out. All the best!
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#6 Guillaume Vallee

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 12:53 PM

Thanks a lot guys ! :)
I'll try some possibilities and I'll let you know the results !
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