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Matching Shots w/Exposure


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#1 Andrew Ryan

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 08:44 PM

What happens in situations where your splitting the exposure for a wide shot and than punching in for the CU and may not need as much of the split?

For example if you have someone walking that is backlit and you pan with them and now their side lit in the same shot you split the exposure so your highlights aren't too hot and your shadows aren't too black.

Now when you go into the CU is it common to change the exposure to a more normal look? Not totally expose for normal because it may be hard to cut but if you were a stop and a half over on the side of the face in the wide and now your only a stop over for the CU is it a huge difference?
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#2 Steve McBride

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 02:54 PM

If you're talking about a wide shot and then cutting to a close up, you want to light your area evenly so that you don't get the high levels of exposure levels, because you don't want to change your aperature in the middle of a shot because that just looks bad. Then when you cut into your close up, relight the setup for the close up.

If you're talking about a wide flowing into a close up, you're going to want to do the same as before for the wide shot and then have a PA or grip standing next to you or somewhere with a reflector so that when they go in for the close up you can bounce the light into the subject's face to have them stick out.

Hope that's what you were looking for.
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#3 Andrew Ryan

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 03:58 PM

If you're talking about a wide shot and then cutting to a close up, you want to light your area evenly so that you don't get the high levels of exposure levels, because you don't want to change your aperature in the middle of a shot because that just looks bad. Then when you cut into your close up, relight the setup for the close up.

If you're talking about a wide flowing into a close up, you're going to want to do the same as before for the wide shot and then have a PA or grip standing next to you or somewhere with a reflector so that when they go in for the close up you can bounce the light into the subject's face to have them stick out.

Hope that's what you were looking for.


Thanks. I'm not thinking of a pull stop in mid shot. More of what I meant is when you have two extreme's and you split the exposure for the wide. When you go in for the CU (new shot) and like you suggested add some more light or close down a bit (in the instance that you were a 1 1/2 in the wide) so its not as hot for the CU (so maybe you go a stop over) will their be a big jump in the look from shot to shot?
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