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Bleach Bypass w/ 16mm


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#1 Steve Absalom

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 04:00 PM

Hi there.

This is my first time shooting on film and as the camera belongs to the University I go to and we are only allowed to touch it on the day of our scheduled shoots, I do not have the option of shooting what I am told is called a "test roll."
I am intersted in seeing what a bleach bypass would look like on 16mm film. I have seen famous examples from movies shot in 35mm (or what I assume was 35mm) like Saving Private Ryan, but I was wonder just how different it would look in 16mm. I assume it would look a lot worse, more grain and all that.

I was thinking I could shoot on a lower speed film so that it would be a better quality image and since I read that shooting with the intention of doing a bleach bypass requires you to be underexposed one stop, using low speed film would naturally be underexposed, I think.

I'm new it this. Can anyone offer suggestions and maybe even visual examples?

I'm shooting a very short film that 98% of it takes place in a basement during a band's rehearsal. I'm going for very low-key lighting for dramatic effect as well as aiming for the bleach bypass to enhance the gritty, raw feel to it- the story calls for the band to break up rather dramtically and I thought it would work nicely for the whole atmosphere.
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#2 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 05:08 PM

If you look at my reel, from 0:43 to 1:02, that is all BB S16 7217.


View on Vimeo

The footage tends to get grainy, and you have to pay more for the BB process. You can rate your stock one stop faster (I rated mine 400) or you can rate it normally and pull process to minimize grain, but it is even more expensive that way. Your idea to use slower film stock would work well, if you choose the right stock. 7212 100T rated 200 ASA would be ideal for BB, as it is one of the finest grained stocks out there. And it also depends how much grain you like . . .

I would not recommend low key lighting for BB. The contrast is increased when you leave the bleach out so your shadows won't retain much info. BB usually calls for stronger lighting. Minority Report was BB'd and it was wonderfully lit in that strong, contrasty way.

However, the BB look can be achieved in post as well if you do a 2K xfer and color correct with DaVinci or similar gear. That way you can completely control it.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 10 February 2009 - 05:10 PM.

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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 07:45 PM

your site is password protected. May I take a look?

I would also recommend that you get the look you want in post since you can not shoot a test first. Post an image or two of the look you are going after. Shoot a digital still, time it in Photoshop and post it hear. Perhaps we can advise you. What kind of camera and lens set up are you using? I know you can't get your hands on it yet, but again, we maybe we can help. Probably the best all around stock you could use is the 7219 or the Fuji Eterna 500T, which is cheaper, softer and finer grained. Both are fast enough and flexible enough to yield a good image in most situations. If you are shooting outdoor in daytime, shoot with the finest grain you can get away with. Both the 7205 and 8663 are extremely fined grained when exposed enough. I would recommend that you expose one stop over for the entire shoot. this will give you finer looking grain and plenty of wiggle room for the transfer.

Edited by Chris Burke, 10 February 2009 - 07:47 PM.

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#4 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 02:58 AM

Oops!

I changed it, so those interested can see it. Sorry and thanks for the heads up.
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Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Willys Widgets

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Tai Audio

Ritter Battery