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Manual Exposure Super 8


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#1 Aleierd

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 01:21 PM

Hello Guys,

i'm just thinking about getting myself a super 8 camera. I am used to 16 and 35 mm cameras. And i am used to expose manually. As i read something about s8 cameras i got quite confused about some comments i read. I read something about some cameras only support specific stocks. Now my question: Am i able to use every stock as long as i expose manually, so i don't have to take care about which stock my camera supports?
If i shoot on 500t Vision2 for example, i just should be able to expose it like i would be shooting on 16mm. i can't explain it to myself why this shouldn't be possible. But i just wanted to ask to be sure.

Many thanks, and sorry for my bad english...

Alejio
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#2 andy oliver

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 06:25 PM

Hi, i've found that the best super 8 cameras for manual exposure are the ones with a proper iris, ie, leicina special and say a beaulieu 4008,5008,6008 or 7008. As your used to 'T' stops a beaulieu fitted with an angenieux 6-80 would the the best set up. I've alway found hit slightly hit/miss when using manual exposure, with reversal stock on a camera without a proper iris on the lens barrel... Yes one can use any speed of film stock on any super 8 camera with a manual exp over ride...
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#3 Jim Carlile

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 01:16 AM

If i shoot on 500t Vision2 for example, i just should be able to expose it like i would be shooting on 16mm. i can't explain it to myself why this shouldn't be possible. But i just wanted to ask to be sure.

Many thanks, and sorry for my bad english...

Alejio


Sure. Just remember that the viewfinder path soaks up a little light, so compensate by about 1/2 to 1 full f/stop-- this depends upon the camera. Open up the aperture a bit more from the reading-- best thing to do is experiment to see the effect.
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#4 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 10:23 PM

Yes, you can shoot on manual. But you have to shoot a test roll first - which is best done with reversal film and projected. You need to find out just how much light is lost by the viewfinder, and also the shutter speed of the camera. You can then work out a 'factor' for adjusting the asa of your stock that takes into account these two issues.
Here is a link to my site where I discuss this more:
http://nanolab.com.au/bracketed.htm
cheers,
richard
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