Jump to content


Photo

The International


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Tim Tyler

Tim Tyler

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1291 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Olympia, WA (US)

Posted 14 February 2009 - 05:06 PM

I was surprised at how great The International looked.

Frank Griebe's exquisitely framed wide shots combined with the Ken Adam-like production design really made the film worth watching.

The aerial shots that served as transitions to new locales seemed ultra-sharp and detailed so I wonder if they were shot with VistaVision or maybe even Imax.
  • 0

#2 Allen Achterberg

Allen Achterberg
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Santa Maria CA

Posted 14 February 2009 - 06:53 PM

I know that some shots were 65, according to the AC article. I don't recall reading if the aerial shots were or not. Frank Griebe is an amazing cinematographer. I really loved his work on Perfume the story of a murderer. I'm excited to see the international.
  • 0

#3 Henry Weidemann

Henry Weidemann
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Student
  • Germany

Posted 14 February 2009 - 07:31 PM

I watched the movie on Thursday and thought it looked good. At one close up shot of Naomi Watts I could recognize a small blurring but that really doesn't matter :rolleyes: . Especially the aerial shots looked really great...and I agree to what Tim noted above: The framing was really nice.

Edited by Henry Weidemann, 14 February 2009 - 07:32 PM.

  • 0

#4 georg lamshöft

georg lamshöft
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 310 posts
  • Berlin

Posted 15 February 2009 - 12:18 PM

I attended a panel discussion on the Berlinale with Tom Tykwer and Sepp Reidinger, he also mentioned using not only the Arriflex 765 but also Vistavision. The aerial/architecture sequences and the opening/closing scene are shot with larger formats.

"The Perfume" is also a very interesting, great looking movie - but every Tykwer-movie (all photographed by Frank Griebe) so far was visually appealing (Heaven with Cate Blanchett was his first international one, I'm not sure if "Krieger und Kaiserin" is available in English, though?). To me one of the very few German Director/DP-combos capable of visually state-of-the-art work, reminds me of Luc Besson's unusual, poetry-like work.
  • 0

#5 Allen Achterberg

Allen Achterberg
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Santa Maria CA

Posted 15 February 2009 - 05:34 PM

I first noticed Griebe after watching "Der Krieger und Die Kaiserin" and have followed his work since. Das Auge Tom Tykwer's he's been called. I would love to team with a director like they have.
  • 0

#6 Antti Näyhä

Antti Näyhä
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 153 posts
  • Other
  • Belgium/Finland

Posted 27 March 2009 - 03:43 AM

Finally saw this a couple of days ago. I have to say I'm not a big fan of Tykwer – I always found him a bit prentetious. That being said, I did enjoy Der Krieger und die Kaiserin and Griebe's work is always interesting.

The 35mm print and projection of The International here in Sydney were absolutely superb. The 65mm-originated shots were probably the sharpest images I've ever seen in a 35mm projection. It was truly an eye-opening experience to see how much you can squeeze out of the 117-year old film format using modern technology! (Although I'm not sure if I liked the way the graded the film… I thought they crushed the blacks a little bit too much, though this was most certainly the look they were after.)

I've seen 65mm-originated 35mm before in such films as The Little Buddha and The New World, but I have to say there wasn't much difference in sharpness in the prints/projections I saw – not even in the IMAX sequences of The Dark Knight! I guess that more than anything, this tells a sad story about the quality of most wide-release 35mm prints and multiplex projection nowadays.

After seeing this film, I'm convinced that shooting 5-perf 65mm is an excellent option for films that will be released in 35mm and (mostly 2K) digital. Frankly, I'm just not convinced that shooting in IMAX would be worth the extra cost and inconvenience for most productions, when 5/65mm is already this good. Here's hoping that 4K DI prices go down soon, so more films can afford to go the 65mm route…
  • 0

#7 georg lamshöft

georg lamshöft
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 310 posts
  • Berlin

Posted 27 March 2009 - 11:01 AM

They used their 65mm Arriscan in Munich but only used (6k->)4k for the larger formats and scanned the Super35-segments only in (3k->)2k.
That's propably an explanation why the difference is this big even in 35mm-prints.

I was surprised to hear that they used a 2k-DI, because it was a quite expensive movie and Tykwer has been really succesful with "the Perfume". 2 years ago "little children" was done entirely with a 4k-DI and even the first Polish movie with a 4k-DI was released last year...
  • 0

#8 Antti Näyhä

Antti Näyhä
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 153 posts
  • Other
  • Belgium/Finland

Posted 28 March 2009 - 01:01 AM

They used their 65mm Arriscan in Munich but only used (6k->)4k for the larger formats and scanned the Super35-segments only in (3k->)2k.
That's propably an explanation why the difference is this big even in 35mm-prints.

Well, even the 35mm segments looked very good in this excellent print & projection. The overall experience was more about how good it looked overall than about the quality difference between the two formats.

Paradoxically, I guess that doing the Super 35 DI in 2K – which will always hide some grain – might actually have helped in matching the footage to the grainless 65mm…
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

The Slider

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Technodolly