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Reversal Film


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#1 Luhuna Carvalho

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 06:00 AM

Hi,

I was just chosen by my film school to shoot my final project in 35mm. The short will last 8-10 minutes and the budget for the movie is around 12,000 euros, but the nobody in the crew gets paid since we're all students from the same school and most of the lighting equipment is also property of the school so it comes free. So most of it, 80%, will go torwards the photo department.

Anyway I was thinking about shooting on reversal film, used famously in buffallo 66, if the price is right. Does anybody have an idea if this bumps or downs the stock buying and developing budget? and if so by how much? Also does anybody have any special advices on dealing with this type of stock?

Thanks a lot

Luhuna
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 06:19 AM

The prices for stock/development/telecine fluctuate depending on what type of deal you can work out. However, I can say that with reversal film you really have to nail your exposures. The slightest mis-calculation and you've got either white or black. Furthermore, you're limited in your choices of speed. The fastest reversal out there comes in 1 variety, 100D. This is fine if you're shooting outside... but if you're doing night interiors.. it'll probably be too slow for your needs.
It may be best, perhaps, to just shoot it on Neg and achieve a reversal look in the Telecine, assuming you are doing a supervised. But, again, this is something that should be tested (grab 100ft or so of some stocks which interest you and seriously, test!) to see what is the best way to achieve whatever "look," you're going for.
Also development might be more problematic, as it doesn't run through your normal ENC-2 chemistry. It gets special processing which not all labs will be outfitted for. Make sure you ask them first if they can do the E6 which reversal film requires.

edit: forgot to mention this is all assuming you're talking color reversal film. For B/w the fastest is 200/125.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 11:39 AM

"Buffalo 66" was shot on an old 1970's era VNF reversal stock -- Kodak has obsoleted all VNF stocks and processing. All you can get is Ektachrome 100D, which is a modern E6 stock.

The main problem, assuming you can deal with the contrast and limited exposure latitude, is the cost of the stock and E6 processing, and the few labs that can handle that in large movie rolls. Or you can cross-process it in motion picture color negative chemistry (ECN2) but then you get those strange colors and hyper contrast.
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#4 Luhuna Carvalho

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 06:39 PM

So all in all considering that the d.o.p. is as me a student (although a really good one), the necessary expertise and the fact that i'm shooting in spain (so I guess the laboratories won't have so many possibilities) it's maybe better to forget about this no?
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 06:41 PM

If you can expose you can expose. If you're as good a DP as you think you are, give it a shot. if you can get an good image on reversal film ten you can get a good image on just about anything. I don't think any other medium has quite the same look as reversal. But, you'll need to speak with your lab and also see what is possible with the equipment you have for the locations. If you have night exts you might be out of luck, but you could, in theory, light up an int enough with smaller units to expose at a 100.
Then again, if you are uncertain about your ability to shoot on this particular stock, then perhaps you would be better served going with some neg and then trying to get an approximate "look" in a telecine suite.
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#6 Luhuna Carvalho

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 03:53 AM

Ok, Thanks a lot to everyone, you've been really helpfull in the questions you brought up!
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#7 Peter Ferguson

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 05:11 PM

Ok, Thanks a lot to everyone, you've been really helpfull in the questions you brought up!


check out what ORWO film has out... it's available in the US. Im testing a reversal film now... www.orwona.com
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 10:50 PM

Peter: I think Luhuna is talking about color, not B&W reversal for this project.


I can tell you, Luhuna, that reversal is significantly more expensive than ECN-2, at over a dollar per foot ($3.25/meter). I think it's now up to $1.20 or 1.30. Add to this the fact that telecines are often not set up for reversal scanning (though, due to lack of base mask and higher contrast, it's easier to produce good dynamic range on a scanner), and the aforementioned issues with latitude, and it will definitely add some challenges to your project.

I'd only allow for a total of FIVE stops of latitude with E100VS film, as opposed to NINE+ with Eastman Color Negative process films. Buy a roll of E100VS slide film and you can shoot stills to see how it compares to neg. film. . . C-41 professional films are close enough for comparison purposes, unless there is someone in Europe processing ECN-2 still lengths.



Anyway with only a Euro 12 000 budget, I don't know if the cost of stock more than doubling (processing is probably 4-5 times higher too) is doable. Sorry to be a realist here, maybe with a budget 10x that much you might have a shot at working with this material.


Good luck. . .
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#9 Simon Wyss

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 03:26 AM

Why not?

Eastman 5285
Internegative
(Sound Negative)
Prints

And put the camera on a tripod, please.
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#10 K Borowski

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 04:18 PM

I feel stupid, but I didn't notice that this thead is 2+years old. I'm sure Luhuna made a film already :blink:
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