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Eclair 35/16mm motion picture camera


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#1 Topher Ryan

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 10:22 PM

So, Eclair buffs,

What in the world is this camera that shoots 35 and 16mm? There is one on eBay right now, item #: 270320363048

http://cgi.ebay.com/...em=270320363048

Would you automatically have an ultra 16 and super 16 camera too? The picture of the gate is pretty interesting and I can imagine the whole film path is too. Were there other manufacturers that made dual format cameras. What is the official name/model of this thing?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 10:31 PM

http://www.cinematog...iccameras/clair
http://www.cinematog...S1.htm#cameflex

Most people who got Cameflexes used them to shoot 35mm. I'm not sure anyone has bothered to convert one to Super-16 but you'd figure it must be possible since it can be converted to cover 35mm.
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#3 Topher Ryan

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 11:47 PM

Thanks David.

I'd heard of the Cameflex and Camerette, but never looked much into the 35mm world.

I had thought that the NPR was the first camera with "quick-change" style mags, but apparently the Cameflex had something similar in 1947. Was the Cameflex the first camera to incorporate the back pressure plate in the mag?

Did these cameras perform reasonably well in 16mm, or did they suffer in either format for trying to do 2 things at once?
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#4 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 12:10 AM

The Cameflex is one of the, if not the most versatile camera ever made. The Soviets allegedly copied the design of the Cameflex (without the 16mm capability, alas) to make the Konvas 1M. The motors and other parts of the Cameflex are interchangeable with early 1M and 2M Kovas cameras, if I am not mistaken. The Soviets copied a lot of technology from the West: from nuclear technology, vehicles to cameras, though they seldom surpassed the quality of the products they copied. The Kinor 35 H design was allegedly "borrowed" from the Moviecam SuperAmerica, whose movement was "borrowed" from Mitchell cameras.

But, apparently Kinor is on to something potentially ground breaking, if the Kinor website is to be believed:

http://www.kinor.ru/...cts/camera/dcx/

I didn't even know Kinor was still around (other than making Elite glass), let alone that they were producing digital cinema products. Their DC 2k / HS and 4k cameras look really promising too, not to mention their Flash recorder with built in monitor. Apparently all of these products record on YUV 4:2:2 and Raw formats. RED, Phantom et al could be facing some stiff competition in the years ahead. Who would have thunk ? . .

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 19 February 2009 - 12:14 AM.

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