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fuji stocks for 1950s look


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#1 Edward Goldner

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 10:27 AM

hello all,

i am currently prepping for an upcoming short film and am researching suitable stocks. the film will be shot on 16mm with an arri sr-2. the film is mostly comprised of exteriors and daylight-lit interiors so i am obviously leaning towards a daylight balanced stock. it is a 1950s period film and we're endeavoring to capture a larger-than-life, saturated quality to reflect the pristine, fake surface of the time.

i have previously used kodak stocks but have not had a chance to play with any of the fuji counterparts. from what i have read on this forum, the eterna250d appears to be the best candidate. just wondering which stock people would recommend. also if anyone thinks that kodak stocks would be more suitable than fuji, i'd love to hear why. just to re-iterate, the main criteria for the stock are:

- high saturation
- fine grain structure
- ideally a higher speed stock if possible (without intense grain)

i'm based in melbourne, australia and have not been able to get hold of a fuji pricelist so if anyone has one that they could attach/send, that'd be greatly appreciated. also, does anyone know what fuji's stance is on student discounts? thankyou very much for your time.

kind regards,
edward goldner
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 11:09 AM

hello all,

i am currently prepping for an upcoming short film and am researching suitable stocks. the film will be shot on 16mm with an arri sr-2. the film is mostly comprised of exteriors and daylight-lit interiors so i am obviously leaning towards a daylight balanced stock. it is a 1950s period film and we're endeavoring to capture a larger-than-life, saturated quality to reflect the pristine, fake surface of the time.

i have previously used kodak stocks but have not had a chance to play with any of the fuji counterparts. from what i have read on this forum, the eterna250d appears to be the best candidate. just wondering which stock people would recommend. also if anyone thinks that kodak stocks would be more suitable than fuji, i'd love to hear why. just to re-iterate, the main criteria for the stock are:

- high saturation
- fine grain structure
- ideally a higher speed stock if possible (without intense grain)

i'm based in melbourne, australia and have not been able to get hold of a fuji pricelist so if anyone has one that they could attach/send, that'd be greatly appreciated. also, does anyone know what fuji's stance is on student discounts? thankyou very much for your time.

kind regards,
edward goldner


I think that the Eterna 250D is the way to go. If you crank up the saturation in production design, then the film will not disappoint. Rate it one stop over. It has a softer, more pastel look, that could be very appropriate for a 50's look. Traditionally, Fuji is about 20% cheaper than Kodak. They do offer student discounts as does Kodak. I think the Fuji student program, although this may have changed or not be available down under, is 20% for free and 20% off the rest. Not a bad deal, but do check with the Fuji rep for specifics.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 05:20 PM

If you want saturation and contrast, there is Fuji Vivid 160T, but other than that and Fuji F-64D, the Kodak stocks like Vision-3 500T are generally snappier, more saturated, and finer-grained than the Fuji equivalents (like Eterna 500T), which have a softer look to them. So if you want the fastest stock that is the finest-grained, with the most contrast and saturation, that would be Kodak 5219.

But I suggest looking into Fuji Vivid 160T, maybe even pushed one stop for more speed and contrast -- the slower speed may force you to use a 1950's lighting style, since the color neg stock from 1953 to 1959 was 25 ASA.
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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 06:41 PM

I'd go with Kodak 7217 200T. It's fairly fine-grained for 16mm and has a rich, saturated color palette when combined with color saturated art direction and gelled lights. I've been happy with it rating it a 125ASA. Of course under 5500k light you'd need to use an 85 filter, so it might be too slow for your day interiors.

I'm not a fan of the Fuji Vivid 160T in 16mm, it's much grainier to my eye than the 7217. I've never shot 7205 Kodak 250T or Eterna 250T so I couldn't tell you how those compare.
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#5 Edward Goldner

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 12:09 AM

thank you very much for all your help, i really appreciate it.

just wondering if anyone could possibly provide a link to some material shot on the eterna250d as the footage i have come across on the net is generally quite amateurish so it'd be nice to see a professional example of the stock.

thanks again.

edward goldner
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#6 Matthew Buick

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 08:06 AM

But I suggest looking into Fuji Vivid 160T, maybe even pushed one stop for more speed and contrast -- the slower speed may force you to use a 1950's lighting style, since the color neg stock from 1953 to 1959 was 25 ASA.


Sorry if I'm wrong, but was the 25 ASA Eastmanchrome stock not 1952 - 1959?

Anyway, Edward, Fuji Velvia 50D is a stock matching your needs that is readily available in Super 8, I'm not sure about 16mm, it might possibly be discontinued in that format. Plus, it's only one stop faster than the original! If I were in your shoes I'd personally use Kodachrome, since that stock really shaped how we think of the 1950's, though obviously it's a Kodak stock. In any case, good luck!
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#7 David Auner aac

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 08:26 AM

Sorry if I'm wrong, but was the 25 ASA Eastmanchrome stock not 1952 - 1959?


Hi Matthew,

that might be. Haven't found any info on that stock. But David is talking about negative stock anyways. Quoting Kodak's website here, chronology of film excerpt from 1952:

EASTMAN Color Negative film, 5248. Tungsten, El 25. Daylight, El 16. Speed increase and image structure improvement. Replaced 5247. -- Awarded OSCAR -- (25th Academy Year) Class I. Scientific or Technical Award. Replaced by 5250 in 1959.


Cheers, Dave
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#8 Ian Cooper

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 08:33 AM

...If I were in your shoes I'd personally use Kodachrome, since that stock really shaped how we think of the 1950's, though obviously it's a Kodak stock. In any case, good luck!


Although 16mm Kodachrome 7267 was discontinued by Kodak a couple of years ago.

Wittner are still selling their stocks of super8 kodachrome, but not any 16mm. Wittner do sell Fuji Velvia in 16mm as Wittner Chrome V50D
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