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Recreating a scene from 'The Beach' - Darius Khondji


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#1 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 04:21 PM

Hello everyone..

Im recreating a shot from 'The Beach' (Danny Boyle) shot by Darius Khondji. We are shooting on he 7219 using an SR2 with a minimal lighting package.

I have posted some pics below of the scene im looking to create.

- For the 'bolt' of light in the first few frames Im going to use a 750w leko and im going to shoot it through a gap between two solids, acting as the wall of the shack.

However, In the last picture the mood of the shoot changes with DiCaprio, the key fill direction almost switches completely. Could someone provide me with some insight on how to create that look? I was thinking of hitting my talent with a 1k backed far off through some diffusion and maybe a little blue too.

Any opinions on how to recreate this would be great. Thanks

Pics below.

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Thanks guys!
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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 06:59 PM

It's not so much that the key switches direction, but that the actor steps back into the fill/background light that was already there. You can see the same source filling the shadowed side of his face in the first couple frames. The light is rather soft and toppy and gelled a cyan color. I would think something like a kino was used, or a light into a bounce board armed high up and to the left of frame. The highlight on Leo's shoulder in the last frame gives away the position of the source. I don't think a 1k backed up will give you this effect, even with diff. on it, it's too small of a source relative to the subject and thus too hard.

Think about mixing color temps between the two light sources. You'll need some kind of backing to get the blue sky outside - maybe a bedsheet lit with blue gel or just a large white bounce board or silk. And don't forget the smoke!
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#3 David Rakoczy

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 07:06 PM

Nice Satsuki!

Tho it could be a lamp thru a diffusion frame on that overhead fill... not necessarily a kino... I would wager it was a larger source and just flagged off the back wall.

Great suggestion on the bed sheet!... way to think about your audience and give an answer that applies to students... pros could use that as well.

Nice reply.
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#4 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 06:19 AM

wow, great! Thanks for the input so far. Great idea with the bed sheet, I might use a large silk instead but yeah, I will definitely use a gag like that - It adds a little contrast too. To be honest, I was also thinking of bouncing a source high and to the left of the actor to create that soft, toppy look I even spoke to my teacher about it, I just thought it would be a little too soft for that particular scene and mood.

Any ideas about processing the stock to nail the look even more?

Cheers.
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 07:36 AM

Can you shoot 7217 (200t)... I think that would match much better. You may want to dye that bed sheet a shade of gray... a silk will end up pure white and that is not what we are seeing in the still you provided. of course you can't run ACE or CCE (Deluxe's ENR) to build up the blacks on your print so you'll have to rely on telecine for that... can you attend the telecine.. or are you held to a one light?

You are going to really want to POUND that shaft of light through the door so you can close down enough for the background to fall off... be ready with your NDs! An open face unit just out of frame will work well.
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#6 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 07:59 AM

When I mentioned the silk, i forgot to say I would shoot a 1k onto it with some blue gel. I may just go with the white bed sheet idea, I'm sure I can get a cheap one at target or somewhere.

I may get the footage telecine'd but at the moment probably not, Can you not do much with a one light transfer? I've only ever been in to telecine twice.

Cheers
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#7 David Rakoczy

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 08:54 AM

Do you shoot a Color Chart at the head of each scene? Do you know why?
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#8 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 08:57 AM

Do you shoot a Color Chart at the head of each scene? Do you know why?


Yeah we do shoot a colour chart. For example yesterday, we shot the colour chart under a blue light so Fotokem would time it to the chart so it would look a little warm. We were shooting on the 7219 and recreating a shot from the opening of the godfather.

I assume you are asking me if I knew why we do that. And my answer is so you can time the footage to the colour you want in telecine or when they print?

Edited by Jamie McIntyre, 25 February 2009 - 09:02 AM.

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#9 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 10:00 AM

Here is my awful attempt at using Apple Pages and lines for a lighting diagram, sort of. haha

Posted Image

Any input is much appreciated.
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#10 David Rakoczy

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 10:21 AM

Yeah we do shoot a colour chart. For example yesterday, we shot the colour chart under a blue light so Fotokem would time it to the chart so it would look a little warm. We were shooting on the 7219 and recreating a shot from the opening of the godfather.

I assume you are asking me if I knew why we do that. And my answer is so you can time the footage to the colour you want in telecine or when they print?


Absolutely. ... and that is a One Light.
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#11 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 10:27 AM

Absolutely. ... and that is a One Light.



Haha cool. I was afraid my answer was going to sound silly. I guess I need to be a little bit more confident of my knowledge.

Thanks!
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#12 David Rakoczy

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 11:25 AM

A one light is corecting the color chart and letting it roll from there... For better or for worse :o

That is the way to learn.

Sent from my IPhone.
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#13 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 11:59 AM

A one light is corecting the color chart and letting it roll from there... For better or for worse :o

That is the way to learn.

Sent from my IPhone.


Sweet. Could you clarify what the differences are between a 1,2, and 3 light transfer?

Cheers
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#14 David Auner aac

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 12:23 PM

Sweet. Could you clarify what the differences are between a 1,2, and 3 light transfer?


Hi Jamie,

one light means that the lights of the telecine unit are adjusted one time only at the start of the roll. The higher quality telecine is one where the operator adjusts the lights for each shot.

Cheers, Dave
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#15 David Rakoczy

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 01:21 PM

Here is a bit more:

1. there is the One Light.

2. there is a 'Supervised' Transfer where the shots are massaged as the colorist sets to transfer.

3. there is the 'Final' where a lot of time ($) is spent doing the final color correction either from the neg again (using key code from the edit) or as a Tape to Tape Final Color Correction (using time code from the EDL).... from the original transfered footage (one lighted or supervised).
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#16 Serge Teulon

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:09 PM

I completely agree with David....Satsuki, that was a great post! Clear and concise.

Jamie - on your diagram you haven't included the sheet idea that Satsuki gave to recreate the sky. Is that on purpose?

Visually it looks like a lovely situation to recreate...
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#17 David Rakoczy

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:23 PM

If I may add, Serge, that Bounce (what looks like a Fill) might not be needed.. he may actually even need 'Negative Fill' on that side. I don't see the Overhead.. which is not a bounce but a softer directional source flagged off the back wall. I would imagine that only two sources for the interior are needed. The hard Light coming in (maybe with Opal Frost) and that overhead soft (Kino or lamp thru Diffusion). Then just create that sky outside the door/ window.
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#18 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:47 PM

I completely agree with David....Satsuki, that was a great post! Clear and concise.

Jamie - on your diagram you haven't included the sheet idea that Satsuki gave to recreate the sky. Is that on purpose?

Visually it looks like a lovely situation to recreate...


Serge,

I didn't draw the 'sky' sheet in because I didn't want the diagram to appear messy, after all it was drawn in a word document program and I was running out of ideas of how to create certain objects without everything looking the same.

Cheers,


Jamie.
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#19 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 02:02 PM

David,

I also managed to get hold of some of the 7217 stock, so I will shoot the scene on both the 7219 and the 17 to compare. I feel I will learn more this way.

Thanks for your your input with this matter though, I appreciate it.
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#20 David Rakoczy

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 02:53 PM

Great that you got the 200t.. I believe you will prefer it. The difficulty with this set up is achieving the contrast esp. on 7219 which sees everything!

Let's really set you up Jamie. I hope you have or have access to a spot meter.

Shooting 7217 I would:

1. Rate it at 120iso

2. Set your stop to t8 (you can add ND if you want to open up... I'd probably add ND 9 and shoot at a t2.8 lit to a t8.

3. Light so you get these readings on your spot meter (rated at 120iso).. refer to your third image posted:

... Overhead Fill - Spot reading of t.2.8 or .2.8 2/10ths on the underneath of Leo's right eye... set that light and turn it off.

... Key Light - Spot reading of t.16 on the bridge of Leo's nose.. other areas may get you a 22 - 32+ depending on if the talent has sweat etc.

... Sky - Spot reading of t.16 1/2 on a slightly graytinted bed sheet with 1/4 or 1/2 CTB on the Lamp.. turn them all on and check again.

You are going to need a very dark background esp. while shooting the 7219... you may even increase everything one stop so you are lit to shoot at a t.11 to get that contrast... then ND yourself down to t4.. or t.2.8.... etc.

Be ready to bring in Negative Fill to knock down bouncing ambient to get that contrast... place a 4x4 floppy so as that Key light comes through and as it passes your talent it buries itself and is sucked up by a 4x4 Solid.

Dial in your background to taste.

I am sure they are other ideas on this... Darius?
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