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Lighting a second-floor appartment


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#1 Vincent Biron

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 10:39 PM

Greetings to all...


I searched for a previous answer, but couldn't find a right answer....


I'm about to start shooting the second season of a comedy series here on MusiquePlus, and production has switched location from last year. The show is mostly set in an apartment.

So, on the first season, I used to light it with a 1.2K HMI Par on a Sky-High Rolling Stand through the window and two Diva-Lites as fill, going for that "it's always sunny look" .

However, that apartment was set on the ground floor, and now they're talking about getting a second-floor appartment, which has windows about 20' from the ground.

Now any thoughts on....

1. How I could rig a 575W or 1.2K HMI outside a second story window (Big stands are out of the question- too long to move them)

2. Or how I could simulate light coming trough a window from the inside?


thanks guys!
Vincent
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 11:22 PM

Is there a balcony. roof or something you can rig off from above?

But to be honest.. Stands on the ground can be one of the fastest ways to move lights.. depending on your Crew foremost.. and equipment second.
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#3 timHealy

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 11:36 AM

Greetings to all...


I searched for a previous answer, but couldn't find a right answer....


I'm about to start shooting the second season of a comedy series here on MusiquePlus, and production has switched location from last year. The show is mostly set in an apartment.

So, on the first season, I used to light it with a 1.2K HMI Par on a Sky-High Rolling Stand through the window and two Diva-Lites as fill, going for that "it's always sunny look" .

However, that apartment was set on the ground floor, and now they're talking about getting a second-floor appartment, which has windows about 20' from the ground.

Now any thoughts on....

1. How I could rig a 575W or 1.2K HMI outside a second story window (Big stands are out of the question- too long to move them)

2. Or how I could simulate light coming trough a window from the inside?


thanks guys!
Vincent


I think the cheapest way to do it would be using scaffolding and building a platform outside the windows. If this is a long job, it will be worth taking the time and money to build it. It would also help you from going completely insane during the course of the job.

Best

Tim
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#4 Vincent Biron

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 03:35 PM

I think the cheapest way to do it would be using scaffolding and building a platform outside the windows. If this is a long job, it will be worth taking the time and money to build it. It would also help you from going completely insane during the course of the job.

Best

Tim


David : Alas, no balcony and the roof isn't accessible... Actually, I wouldn't go for the stands on the ground as the building is really squeezed between other buildings and big trees, and moving big stands around those obstacles would be a bitch.

Thanks guys... Yeah, I was thinking about scaffolding, cause it got mentioned during our first location visit... Some were already installed for renovations, and we though it could make a great solution to my problems. Since were gonna be in that apartment for 4 months, I guess it's worth the time.

My only concern with them is them being too visible in some of the coverage we're going for. Anyways, I guess I could blow out the windows a little more, and make them wash out....

I'll try sending pictures asap...

Thanks again...
Vincent
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#5 Kiarash Sadigh

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 09:39 PM

One of the boys made this set up for me on a set of a low budget feature I did : a ladder at the bottom of your window ( sand bag the hell out of it, or rope it) , a c-clamp that has a 2k spigot biting into the upper body of your ladder with the spigot pointing directly up , take a turtle-base c stand, take the base off and secure it into your 2k spigot ....now you have a c-stand on top of your ladder which will reach up easily to a second floor window...
have fun!
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#6 Toby Orzano

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 11:47 PM

One of the boys made this set up for me on a set of a low budget feature I did : a ladder at the bottom of your window ( sand bag the hell out of it, or rope it) , a c-clamp that has a 2k spigot biting into the upper body of your ladder with the spigot pointing directly up , take a turtle-base c stand, take the base off and secure it into your 2k spigot ....now you have a c-stand on top of your ladder which will reach up easily to a second floor window...
have fun!

Sounds sketchy as hell...I like it! Only thing is it's going to be really close to the window and you don't really have the option to back it off. It could work in a pinch, but if the production is going to span four months then something permanent may be needed. Sounds like scaffolding is the thing.

My only concern with them is them being too visible in some of the coverage we're going for.

If you're worried about it being in shot, couldn't you just bring the scaffolding up to a level that's just below the level of the window and then use a regular stand on the scaffolding that could easily be moved out of shot?
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#7 Ralph Keyser

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 05:26 PM

A scissor lift or a condor might be an option too, and they're quicker to move than scaffolding so it might make coverage easier. Scaffolding will be cheaper, of course.
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#8 Vincent Biron

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 08:29 PM

Hey all!

Thanks again for the suggestions...

Toby : Yeah, I guess we wouldn't see them that much, but the director wanted some shots trough the window shooting in the backyard, as the story involves all tenants of a three-stories building... I guess I'll just shoot around the scaffolding....

Ralph : :lol: --- Condor? Yeah, forgot to mention I'm in Montreal. Most features here rarely have that kind of gear (except american shoots) - let alone MusiquePlus (the québecois MTV) I'm shooting with only a gaffer and a camera assistant. I'm trying to push for grip, but were just too low-budget.

Vincent B.
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#9 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 08:55 PM

Since you're using such a small unit (1.2K hmi), just put a crank stand on scaffolding, and undersling the light on a 2k triple header. That will make it much easier to hide. If the ground is a little uneven, you can put 2"x12"x16' planks under the scaffold wheels so that it's easy to roll around.
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#10 Joe Giambrone

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 04:45 PM

"Alas, no balcony and the roof isn't accessible... Actually, I wouldn't go for the stands on the ground as the building is really squeezed between other buildings and big trees..."

Just a wacky idea -- could you hang a large china ball from a tree branch next to the window?
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