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Shooting Stop Motion at a 90 Degree Angle


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#1 Donnie Lewis

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 11:14 PM

Hi, I'm shooting a stop motion animation this week, and I was wondering how I could mount an HVX200 at 90 degrees. I'd like to hang it overhead 5-7 feet off the ground. It's a pretty small studio, so a jib won't fit. Polecats, maybe? I can't seem to wrap my head around it.

Thanks alot.
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#2 Mike Lary

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 04:08 AM

How wide is your field of view? Could you ratchet a high hat to the top step of a ladder, or would the ladder be in the shot?
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#3 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:29 AM

I'm not familiar with the camera you are using, but I would reccomend using a screwjack based wall spreader. I would not trust a cam based expansion spanset. If you can, you should drop vertical supports out of shot. I would recommend the avenger crosspoles.They are quite strong. Use 2 at 90 degrees to each other if possible.
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#4 Alexa Mignon Harris

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 01:56 PM

Hi, I'm shooting a stop motion animation this week, and I was wondering how I could mount an HVX200 at 90 degrees. I'd like to hang it overhead 5-7 feet off the ground. It's a pretty small studio, so a jib won't fit. Polecats, maybe? I can't seem to wrap my head around it.

Thanks alot.


Hi guys!

Since the HVX is so small and light and the studio is small I agree with Sanjay's route. If I had that situation I would get my hands on a mitchell based high hat mounted on a 2x2 ft wooden pancake, a fisher 90 degree angle plate, a 100mm or 75mm ball tripod head, a 100mm or 75mm ball to mitchell adopter, two pieces of speedrail fitted to the room, four pigeon plates, four grid clamps with baby pins and four goboheads. I'd rig the wall speaders about a foot and a half apart (close enough so the high hat can rest on the rails, make sure the rails are level.) On the bottom of the high hat I screw in four pigeons so that the points would come down on the inside of the two pieces of rail. To the rails I'd attach the four pipe clamps, two across from each other with the pins pointing towards each other. To these I'd attach the gobo heads. Than Id slip the pigeons pins into the gobos. Just measure on the ground so everything lines up. It sounds complicated if you don't know the gear but this is very basic rigging. Once the high hat is in place I'd tie it down to the pipes for extra support. If the studio has a grid also safety your rig to that. Than I'd attach the 90 degree plate and strap that to the hat for extra support. Than attach the ball head (make sure you have the ball adoptor). Than attach your camera. Saftey everything. Now you have your angle and flexibility with the tripod head. I did something very similar to this rig last year over a bed and it worked beautifully. Have a wonderful shoot! =)

Cheers!
Alexa Harris
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#5 Alexa Mignon Harris

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 02:12 PM

hmmmm... I was getting ready to go out and get some tacos when I realized I would actually want the high hat pigeon points on the outside of the rails. This would distribute the overall weight better. So then the grid clamp pins and the gobos would also be on the outside of the two parallel rails. =)
-Alexa
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