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Quick Question, CFLs


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#1 DS Williams

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 04:18 AM

Hi all,

I apologize if this has been covered inside of other threads or posts, but I wanted to know,

Have any of you started using CFLs in your on set practicals? Seeing that they put out more lumans per watt, and are more efficient?

I am considering doing this on a shoot inside a hotel room, to provide more motivated ambient light so I don't need to use an open faced light pointed at the ceiling to raise the ambient level.

What do you think?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 04:55 AM

Hi all,

I apologize if this has been covered inside of other threads or posts, but I wanted to know,

Have any of you started using CFLs in your on set practicals? Seeing that they put out more lumans per watt, and are more efficient?

I am considering doing this on a shoot inside a hotel room, to provide more motivated ambient light so I don't need to use an open faced light pointed at the ceiling to raise the ambient level.

What do you think?


Not if I can avoid it, the color rendition is not that good
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 05:01 AM

Some of them can be ok in my experience, but it's chancy at best, and on top of all of that, you can't really dim them the same way you can a typical household bulb.
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#4 DS Williams

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 09:38 AM

Some of them can be ok in my experience, but it's chancy at best, and on top of all of that, you can't really dim them the same way you can a typical household bulb.


Thank you for your comments guys, but you see, I'm using Lowel CFLs that have a supposed CRI of >95. I assume they put out good light quality with a true spectrum? They are more expensive than household CFL's you buy at Home Depot, made my GE, Edison, ect. Are those the ones you are talking about?

Here is a link to the ones I use

http://www.bhphotovi...t_120_Volt.html
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 03:14 PM

With that high of a CRI, you should be ok, minus the dimming. I'd check, though, because at least in my opinion florescents don't render nice skin tones on people, not even the Kino tubes and as I said, I'd not think you could dim it down.
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#6 Mike Williamson

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 04:55 PM

CFL's are nice if you want to balance your practicals to daylight, I think the 5600K ones look better than blue dipped Photofloods. I've also used the 3500K bulbs with a low CRI to get a fluorescent look in an urban/industrial setting, in a clamp light in a warehouse for example. Otherwise I'd go with regular tungsten bulbs, they have better color rendition as already mentioned, and have the advantage of being dimmable.
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#7 DS Williams

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 07:36 PM

in my opinion florescents don't render nice skin tones on people

Yes I've realized that. I tend to gravitate to a tungsten+chimera softbox setup for pleasant skin tones during interviews. Do any of you tend to prefer the look of tungsten on skintones?
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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 07:40 PM

I most certainly do. Though I'm not adverse to the look of an HMI or a Floro when called for but it just seems, almost an "impersonal" light.. cold.. distant, whereas Tungsten gives a nearly "golden" look .
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#9 DS Williams

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 07:40 PM

And one more quick question,

Does a lower CRI result in a higher green spike? I went to the KinoFlo showroom the other day and the salesman said something about the mercury in the lamp getting too excited and raising in temperature, causing a green spike. Can anyone elaborate on this? Forgive my ignorance
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#10 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 07:45 PM

That has been my main understanding of CRI, but also it has to do with how "well" it renders all colors.
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#11 Chris Bowman

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 12:01 AM

And one more quick question,

Does a lower CRI result in a higher green spike? I went to the KinoFlo showroom the other day and the salesman said something about the mercury in the lamp getting too excited and raising in temperature, causing a green spike. Can anyone elaborate on this? Forgive my ignorance


From what I understand, CRI has a direct correlation with green spikes, and any spike in general. There is a fairly good explanation of CRI and fluorescent lights here
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#12 DS Williams

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 02:06 AM

From what I understand, CRI has a direct correlation with green spikes, and any spike in general. There is a fairly good explanation of CRI and fluorescent lights here



That makes sense, as any irregular spike in a color frequency would represent an unbalanced color output, or not "true" color rendering. I'll look at the article.
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