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#1 Alex Wuijts

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 02:20 PM

Hello,

I will shoot a short video for a fashion designer for a coming fashion biennale. Every one of her designs is made up of small, interchangeable parts. What we want to do is film the models at normal speed moving around, with the clothing parts constantly changing.
We might even want to try out some slow mo stuff although our shooting format isn't decided yet.

Any advice on how to achieve this effect would be greatly appreciated!
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 02:35 PM

Hmm.. sounds like a job for motion control for me. though I'd think the biggest issue would be that the model themselves probably won't hit the same marks every time. . .
Basically the ideal would be to repeat the same camera motion (if any) and same talent motion over and over again in all the different elements of the clothes.
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#3 Alex Wuijts

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 04:31 PM

Hmm.. sounds like a job for motion control for me. though I'd think the biggest issue would be that the model themselves probably won't hit the same marks every time. . .
Basically the ideal would be to repeat the same camera motion (if any) and same talent motion over and over again in all the different elements of the clothes.


Thanks Adrian. If I would be able to have the models repeat the same motion a couple of times it would be a lot easier, so that definitely poses a problem.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 04:45 PM

It's certailny a pain in the ass.
the other way you could try it would be to shoot the model and the elements separate. put motion tracking marks on, and motion track the other elements onto them. This would mean that they don't need to repeat the same move over and over again, but it does mean that they'll be some more head aching later on and you need to make sure your post suite of choice allows motion tracking (FCP doesn't, Motion does, though but hell if I know how to use it, Avid does as well.. After Effects is probably the best choice though)
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#5 wolfgang haak

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 06:47 AM

Adrian, Alex,

I like your advance towards using CGI Adrian. Well, your geek alert sirens should go off now:
Yes, of course it's possible to CG the stuff, but to have it looking convincing bear a few things in mind:

Motion: A person is not a rigid body. Matchmoving is more complicated as skin stretches and deforms. So does cloth. To have the clothes shot separately and then stick them in in AE will probably look like they were stuck on in post.
Transparency: If there are any transparent parts in the clothes, this approach will not work, as the skin needs the be seen underneath, together with appropriate changes to lighting.
Lighting: Most fabrics show interesting anisotropic effects. Brrr... Above method may have the exchanged part not fit in the shot in terms of lighting.

Add to this the complications of fabric creases and folds, the distortion of clothes due to walking bounce, air/drag. Brrrr... IMHO, it's not as simple as sticking a few track markers on a lady and load the trajectories into a post package.

If you go the CG route, I would think that you need some consulting from pro's. Approach a company with experience and get their opinion on the matter.
Cloth simulation is quite advanced these days and it may be easier to shoot the "talent" naked and stick her clothes on in CG. Unless the final result may not hold up to the most critical of eyes (unless you are prepared to part with substantial amounts of cash), however this approach would allow a high degree of consistency in the shots and thus be more believable.

kind regards,
Wolfgang
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#6 Freya Black

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 11:11 AM

Hello,

I will shoot a short video for a fashion designer for a coming fashion biennale. Every one of her designs is made up of small, interchangeable parts. What we want to do is film the models at normal speed moving around, with the clothing parts constantly changing.
We might even want to try out some slow mo stuff although our shooting format isn't decided yet.

Any advice on how to achieve this effect would be greatly appreciated!


I'm not sure what you mean about the parts constantly changing. Do you mean that they constantly move and interact with the light in intresting ways?

If so I'd be inclined to shoot it on film and maybe shoot it a few times till you get lucky. Film would capture the light interactions better, (assuming you are talking about the light). It should also be possible to light things so that you get some kind of effect even if that effect is different each time, you wouldn't be able to predict exactly what would happen but you would know the kind of thing that would happen and I'm sure something nice would be on the film.

However I don't really understand what you are saying and clearly other people are interpreting what you are saying differently to me as they are talking of motion tracking etc, so maybe you mean more something to do with movement itself than the way movement interacts with light?

I'm curious about what you mean!
Kind of sounds like an interesting project actually. :)

love

Freya
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