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examples of movies shot on 35mm reversal


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#1 Mark Townend

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 11:32 AM

i'm looking movies shot on 35mm reversal stock.
any examples would be greatly appreciated. thanks.
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#2 Elliot Rudmann

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 12:13 PM

i'm looking movies shot on 35mm reversal stock.
any examples would be greatly appreciated. thanks.


I think parts of Domino were filmed w/ 5285 ektachrome
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#3 Ian Jackson

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 12:28 PM

Buffalo 66 was shot on on reversal
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 02:26 PM

Weren't parts of 3 Kings also shot reversal?
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#5 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 06:11 PM

I think parts of Man on Fire were shot on 5285
Great Movie as well!!!

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#6 John Brawley

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 05:22 PM

i'm looking movies shot on 35mm reversal stock.
any examples would be greatly appreciated. thanks.


Clockers rings a bell for me.

jb
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#7 Theo Sundal Holen

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:27 PM

Bear in mind that both Domino and 3 Kings were shot on reversal stock but cross processed in negative chemicals.
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#8 Sing Howe Yam

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 12:11 AM

Kill Bill 2 the part of Pei Mei was shot on 5285 but then crossed.
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#9 Simon Wyss

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:42 AM

I am still at work, slow though, with our Gigabitfilm, ISO 40, advertisement short in 35 mm. The stock undergoes reversal treatment but then we need to produce an internegative and positives on Gigabitfilm HDR, ISO 32, for enough contrast on the screen. The original is rather grey and white than black and white. The pictures blow me out the shoes, even the third generation shows no grain.
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#10 John Sprung

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 04:56 PM

i'm looking movies shot on 35mm reversal stock.
any examples would be greatly appreciated. thanks.


The river rapids stuff in "African Queen" was shot on Monopack, the ancestor of ECO. Then they made negative separations to intercut with the rest of the show, which was three strip Technicolor. That was the reason for 35 reversal in the first place, to get around the logistical constraints of three strip.





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#11 Ian Jackson

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 05:30 PM

Also... the 'Sniper' scenes in "Phone Booth" were shot on reversal if i remember correctly
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#12 Joe Riggs

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 10:23 PM

A lot of Spike Lee movies have at least some sections shot on 35 reversal, Clockers was mentioned, He Got Game, 25th Hour, Son of Sam are some of the others I believe.
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#13 Topher Ryan

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 10:53 AM

Buffalo 66 was shot on on reversal


Anyone have more specifics on their process? Stocks etc...

I was thinking they used a reversal stock that has since been discontinued, but I may be thinking of an another film.
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#14 James Compton

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 12:58 PM

Anyone have more specifics on their process? Stocks etc...

I was thinking they used a reversal stock that has since been discontinued, but I may be thinking of an another film.




Buffalo 66 was shot on KODAK 7239. It was cross processed. The DP was Lance Accord.
The director wanted a vintage 'NFL highlight films' look. What type of look do you want? Vivid colors or contrasty desaturated colors ? Wardrobe and Set Design also play a major part in creating the look you want.
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#15 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 03:47 PM

Buffalo 66 was shot on KODAK 7239. It was cross processed. The DP was Lance Accord.


It was shot on 35mm, & it was NOT cross processed.

The 07-98 AC had a brief article about it. That issue is currently on sale for $1.00

http://www.ascmag.co...r...at=0&page=1

Probably more for shipping.
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#16 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 03:54 PM

The river rapids stuff in "African Queen" was shot on Monopack, the ancestor of ECO. Then they made negative separations to intercut with the rest of the show, which was three strip Technicolor. That was the reason for 35 reversal in the first place, to get around the logistical constraints of three strip.


Most of 'King Solomon's Mines'' the African locations was shot on Monopack, actually kodachrome.

If you can catch a35mm print, you might be surprised that the dupe negs from Monopack were sharper and less grainy than the 3-stpip original negs.
The 3-strip had richer color and tones/contrast.
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#17 Ian Jackson

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 06:16 PM

It was shot on 35mm, & it was NOT cross processed.

The 07-98 AC had a brief article about it. That issue is currently on sale for $1.00

http://www.ascmag.co...r...at=0&page=1

Probably more for shipping.


There is also a huge section on this in "New Cinematographers" by A. Ballinger, like Leo said it wasn't cross processed. Accord wanted to keep the 70's NFL film look to it!
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#18 Jason Debus

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 12:57 AM

Regarding Buffalo 66, this is a great interview where Vincent Gallo goes into a little detail on the making & post production of it:

http://www.galloappr...nt/filmmkr.html
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#19 James Compton

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 12:19 PM

It was shot on 35mm, & it was NOT cross processed.

The 07-98 AC had a brief article about it. That issue is currently on sale for $1.00

Probably more for shipping.





Oops. I stand corrected.
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#20 Freya Black

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 03:29 PM

Anyone have more specifics on their process? Stocks etc...

I was thinking they used a reversal stock that has since been discontinued, but I may be thinking of an another film.


I know they had big trouble finding a lab to process the film as the labs that process ektachrome movie film tend to do 16mm/s8 as thats what ppl tend to shoot it in. Not sure they didn't even have to codge something together in the end?
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