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#1 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 05:48 PM

Do I need to use a Filter when shooting this in daylight?

Thanks

Toby
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 05:53 PM

No and Yes.. you won't need one to color balance (i.e. you won't need to add an 85 when shooting in Daylight).. but you certainly could/ should use a host of other filters to achieve your desired image.

Here I go again.. order the book FILM LIGHTING
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#3 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 06:04 PM

David
Thanks for the response. Man you really like that Book don't you? I ordered the book a few weeks ago. I'm about 1/2 done. I will flip through it tonight regarding black and white photography and Filters.
I'm shooting in the Forest. Should be a nice sunny day. I'm going for a low key, high contrast look. What Filters would you suggest i test?
Thanks for the response and the Book recommendation!

Toby
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#4 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 06:33 PM

If I dont use a filter what should I rate the Film at? 64?
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:00 PM

No, it's daylight so she rates as an 80D.
Why not experiment with some BW stills film like TriX and some filters outside see which one suites you?
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#6 Toby L Edwards

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:09 PM

Adrian,
Yes I better shoot some test on the ol trusty OM-1
Thanks

Toby
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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:33 PM

Yes I better shoot some test ....


The way to think about it is that with color film, you filter to get the technically correct balance mostly, unless you're going for an extreme look. With B&W, you're going to get a monochrome image no matter what filters you use. But you have a vast new range of control over how dark or light different objects are depending on their color. The rule is that to make something lighter, use a filter of its color. To make it darker, go for the opposite color. For instance, in your forest, a green filter will make the leaves light, a purple filter would make them dark. Start with that, and test.




-- J.S.
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#8 David Rakoczy

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:41 PM

The Photographer's Guide to Using Filters
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

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Glidecam

Wooden Camera