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Another technical question or two!


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#1 Anne Winter

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:29 PM

Note: I have reposted this under a new topic to distinguish my new question from my old one. I hope that is okay it's just that things have changed following a talk with the director of the short today.

Anyway on to the questions:

1. I am shooting a film on S16mm which will then be telecined and put on to DVD for projection. I believe that we will be getting a grading but I am unsure about a neg cut and final film print I think this will just depend on how much money is left in the budget. So basically I want the finished film to look as good as possible on DVD. Would it still be best to shoot the film at 24fps or would it be better to shoot at 25fps? I ask this because I have been led to believe that filming at 25fps works best for film that will ultimately end up on digital media. Is this correct?

Note: I am based in the UK so it would end up on PAL format.


2. I have a question about crossing the line. I will do a shot of a character walking from a distance around a walkway and then coming to a stop in front of the camera. The character will have his back to the camera at this point looking back to where he originally came.
The director then wants to cut to a long shot of the character taken from the point of view of where the character started his walk and looking out to where the character now is. I do not think that the actor will move in this scene but just stay in a static position facing the camera at quite some distance. Do you think there is a possibility of crossing the line here?

If the character was to then move and carry on down the walkway he would technically be leaving the frame the same way he entered it in the previous shot. Do you think that would be strange?

I hope that is somewhat clear!

Anyway thanks so much for taking a look at my question and I look forward to your feed back.

Many thanks.
Anne
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:43 PM

As regards the frame rate query, shoot 25, no question. You should of course run all this past the people who will do your neg cut and projection, but in general, in PAL places shoot 25. There are even tiny no-budget features which shoot 25, because the small increase in film stock costs is massively outweighed by the savings in audio conforming.

Your postproduction will be in PAL, so your audio will automatically match, and things are generally pleasant and easy if you do come to a neg cut. It's vastly preferable to have everything happen microscopically slowe, if you ever project it at 24, than it would be for all your PAL dubs to be slightly fast.

People will tell you not to do this. These people are idiots.

P
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#3 Hal Smith

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 09:34 PM

I don't think you'll have a problem. In the shot you're talking about, the actor walks toward the camera, stops, then turns around. At that point the audience knows he's facing back down the walkway from where he started. So if you then do a reverse and shoot a long shot of the actor continuing to face where he originally started from, I think the audience will understand the change of viewpoint.
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#4 Mike Lary

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 10:03 PM

Do you think there is a possibility of crossing the line here?

I don't see this being a problem of crossing the line. By changing the subject's relationship with the frame so drastically, you're eliminating the potential for a jarring effect. It might cause the audience to feel detached or make them wonder why they're viewing him from far away (after you let them get so close) and it might make them wonder why he's looking back from whence he came (is he being followed, or leaving something behind?). The context of the shot will determine to some extent how the audience feels, and the pacing of the shot and editing could make the transition seem natural or unsettling.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 12:17 AM

Not crossing the line is only critical when intercutting close-ups so that people look like they are looking at each other (if they are). Otherwise, you can cross the line if the geography is clear, or for creative reasons.

If you look at this sequence from "The Shining" for example, you see that Kubrick does a 180 degree flip for the reverse wide shot in order to stay symmetrical, but when he goes in tighter, he establishes and keeps a screen direction for the looks between the actors:

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#6 Anne Winter

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 11:02 PM

Thank you so much to everyone who answered. I feel a lot more confident now that I have cleared up these little niggles!

Thanks again!
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