Jump to content


Photo

questions about an old o'connor 100 head


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Mihai Nicolau

Mihai Nicolau
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
  • Other
  • Bucharest, Romania

Posted 22 March 2009 - 03:27 AM

Hello,

Wnated to ask you what is the difference between this model and newer ones in terms of adjustability and counterbalance settings. Does it even have a counterbalance and do you know how many fluid drag positions it has for tilt and pan ? Are they stepless like in the newer heads ?

A poster on the red camera forum said that " I couldn't fully engage the safety locking mech on the underside of the ET dovetail (or any dovetail for that matter). It still holds it just as well, but it would be nice to have that extra little assurance. " What is this underside thing for ? Why do you need it if you aready secure the dovetail to the tripod with 2 screws ? that comment was for a 50D head does this 100 have this issue


I've also read that it is pretty heavy. Can you five me an estimate on it's weight ?

And finally and probably most important. Can it withstand the rigours of today's proffesional productions (cmmercials, music videos etc.) ? Or should I just save up and buy a newer head ?

Thanks,
Mike
  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 22 March 2009 - 06:30 AM

Mike I can't speak for the 100 on it's own, but I have an older 50D head from O'Connor and it's one of the best heads I've ever used in my opinion. Now, it has some limitations, but a well maintained O'Connor will take as good care of you as you take of it.
  • 0

#3 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 22 March 2009 - 10:47 AM

Hello,

Wnated to ask you what is the difference between this model and newer ones in terms of adjustability and counterbalance settings. Does it even have a counterbalance and do you know how many fluid drag positions it has for tilt and pan ? Are they stepless like in the newer heads ?

A poster on the red camera forum said that " I couldn't fully engage the safety locking mech on the underside of the ET dovetail (or any dovetail for that matter). It still holds it just as well, but it would be nice to have that extra little assurance. " What is this underside thing for ? Why do you need it if you aready secure the dovetail to the tripod with 2 screws ? that comment was for a 50D head does this 100 have this issue


I've also read that it is pretty heavy. Can you five me an estimate on it's weight ?

And finally and probably most important. Can it withstand the rigours of today's proffesional productions (cmmercials, music videos etc.) ? Or should I just save up and buy a newer head ?

Thanks,
Mike

There are different versions of this head. Depending on which, the weight of the head can vary somewhere between (approx.) 13-17 pounds. It's not overly heavy. The reference above appears to refer to a separate release plate that is found on newer versions of the head. The referenced post indicates that the shaft on the tightening screw is probably bent, which is why the user isn't able to totally tighten the plate down.

Bottom line: You have to assess these heads as to the individual condition of the one you're looking at. If it's not leaking fluid, and all the mechanical functions are working well, then it's still a good tripod head that's quite usable. If it needs any repairs or a rebuild, you may need to sink another 200-500 bucks into it.
  • 0

#4 Mihai Nicolau

Mihai Nicolau
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
  • Other
  • Bucharest, Romania

Posted 22 March 2009 - 11:27 AM

Thanks for the answers. Well the maintenance problem is...no problem :rolleyes: because I found it on the Visual Products website at the used category so I guess it's in as good a condition as it can be.

Other users told me that one of the limitations of this head it's that it cannot tilt up and down the full 90 degrees just about 45 degrees. Is this such a pain in a filming situation ?

And does it have any kind of counterbalance or do I just balance the camera on the plate and that s it ? Does it have a mininum weight at which it puts up resistance. I'm quoting another user about this problem " Also, not sure if this is normal, but there was a spring type of feel to it!?! This made it pull back hard whenever you tilted... that made it basically suck. " this sounds like some kind of counterbalance or malfunction.

Thanks,
Mike
  • 0

#5 Bruce Taylor

Bruce Taylor
  • Sustaining Members
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 22 March 2009 - 07:06 PM

Also, not sure if this is normal, but there was a spring type of feel to it!?! This made it pull back hard whenever you tilted... that made it basically suck. "


Yes, there is a nonadjustable (on the early models I have) counterbalance. I don't think it is really suitable for smaller cameras, though I bought one of mine from a guy who mounted a Bolex on it. It really seems to shine with a larger camera, 30-50 lbs. The Oconnor 50 works well with smaller cameras.

Bruce Taylor
www.indi35.com
  • 0

#6 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 22 March 2009 - 07:52 PM

There are different versions of this head. Depending on which, the weight of the head can vary ............... The referenced post indicates that the shaft on the tightening screw is probably bent, which is why the user isn't able to totally tighten the plate down.


A 1/4" thread elevator bolt (a bolt with a large, flat head), a couple of 1/4" washers, and a 1/4" wing nut will substitute for the original lockdown. At one point I had two 50D's, the second one of which didn't have a lockdown screw and lever. A trip to a good hardware store here solved the problem.
  • 0

#7 Mike Rizos

Mike Rizos
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 330 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 March 2009 - 07:58 PM

Yes the 100 was really made for heavier cameras, and can have one of three settings of counterbalance, depending on the spring intalled at the factory inside the drum. The 3 spring settings were 300, 500, or 700 inch/pounds. There is a formula that is used to determine the correct spring that takes into account the weight of the camera, it's center of gravity, and it's distance from the tilting point.
Tilt and pan are stepless and are adjusted by knobs.
Tilt angle is +/- 60 degrees.
My 100b with handle weighted exacty 20lbs.
  • 0

#8 Mihai Nicolau

Mihai Nicolau
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
  • Other
  • Bucharest, Romania

Posted 23 March 2009 - 04:37 AM

Yes the 100 was really made for heavier cameras, and can have one of three settings of counterbalance, depending on the spring intalled at the factory inside the drum. The 3 spring settings were 300, 500, or 700 inch/pounds. There is a formula that is used to determine the correct spring that takes into account the weight of the camera, it's center of gravity, and it's distance from the tilting point.
Tilt and pan are stepless and are adjusted by knobs.
Tilt angle is +/- 60 degrees.
My 100b with handle weighted exacty 20lbs.


Thanks for all the answers.
I want to use this head with a RED one camera setup. Is it too much ?
  • 0

#9 William Coss

William Coss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera

Posted 23 March 2009 - 05:07 AM

A 1/4" thread elevator bolt (a bolt with a large, flat head), a couple of 1/4" washers, and a 1/4" wing nut will substitute for the original lockdown. At one point I had two 50D's, the second one of which didn't have a lockdown screw and lever. A trip to a good hardware store here solved the problem.



Hal Babe,

That would be 3/8"
  • 0

#10 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 23 March 2009 - 09:26 AM

Hal Babe,

That would be 3/8"

I'm talking about replacing the lock down assembly at the front on a 50D for the detachable camera mounting plate, not the 3/8" tripod screw that locks the camera to the plate.
  • 0

#11 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 23 March 2009 - 10:04 AM

I've never used a RED. But, an O'C 100 seems a bit big for it. Wouldn't a Miller Junior be a little more practical? I use my Junior on my XL2 and get stellar pans and tilts out of it. My O'C 100 is just right for Frankenmitchell.
  • 0

#12 Mike Thorn

Mike Thorn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Grip
  • Cleveland, OH

Posted 23 March 2009 - 01:29 PM

I've never used a RED. But, an O'C 100 seems a bit big for it. Wouldn't a Miller Junior be a little more practical? I use my Junior on my XL2 and get stellar pans and tilts out of it. My O'C 100 is just right for Frankenmitchell.

There is no such thing as an oversized head for RED.

RED/Arri 435 = same difference. Don't risk it.
  • 0

#13 William Coss

William Coss
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera

Posted 23 March 2009 - 03:25 PM

I'm talking about replacing the lock down assembly at the front on a 50D for the detachable camera mounting plate, not the 3/8" tripod screw that locks the camera to the plate.



Sorry,

Thought we were talking about the 100. Tie down on the bottom is 3/8 as well as the head to dovetail. 3/8-16
  • 0

#14 singeroi

singeroi

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 14 May 2009 - 09:14 PM

thanks for the info very helpful!
simulation assurance vie
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Opal

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Willys Widgets