Jump to content


Photo

My E64T hasnt been refridgerated for 7months! Can it be used?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 James Millward

James Millward
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Student

Posted 24 March 2009 - 11:28 AM

Hi, guys, I still havent got round to outting my first ever super 8 rolls through my cam. In fact it has been nearly seven months since I had my Eltachrome 64t delivered!!

I dont know why I didnt, but i didnt store it in the fridge, so it has been in the house (and thus subject to all the fluctuations in temperature) since then.

Should i throw it away nad re-order (costly mistake!), or will it be ok??

Thanks guys
tbip2001
  • 0

#2 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2420 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:10 PM

I don't know where you're from, but you haven't kept it through a hot summer, so unless it's been near the fire or a radiator, or spent a long time above 70F, it'll be fine.
But put it in the freezer now until you need it, as long as you haven't broken the foil wrapping.
  • 0

#3 Oliver Christoph Kochs

Oliver Christoph Kochs
  • Sustaining Members
  • 323 posts
  • Film Loader
  • Germany

Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:14 PM

Depends on the temperature in your house - but should still be okay.
Normally it should be stored around 10-12 degrees and yes, temperature that changes often may
be problematic. If your house is well over 20 degrees you may end up with a slightly reddish film.
Use it. Try one film and see. Put it in the fridge but don't freeze (at 0 deg).

A tale from the past: i once bought a super8 cam at a yard sale that had exposed film in it. The camera was stored in the attic where its hot and warm. It was a K40 (no longer available) and it had a yellow bag so i sent it in for processing. I could still see everything that was on the film - this film dated back to the late 70s early 80s. The latent images was on the film for 20 years in a warm environment.
  • 0

#4 James Millward

James Millward
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Student

Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:54 PM

Thanks for the replys guys. Im in the uk, so it hasnt been hot at all.

So if its affected, it will come out red? Im new to film shooting, so I could make alot of mistakes. When I get my film back from processing I need to know if what im seeing is down to my error, or is as a result of knackered film.

I will pop it in the fridge, and send just one for processing. If it comes back red, ill know its no good?

Thanks again
James
  • 0

#5 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 March 2009 - 01:55 PM

Shoot one roll as a test if you're worried. But I very much doubt that there's any real problem. 7 months in a mild to cool climate is nothing. I've heard lots of stories about raw stock much older and stored in much higher temps being OK.



-- J.S.
  • 0

#6 alan doyle

alan doyle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 March 2009 - 03:19 PM

[quote name='James Millward' date='Mar 24 2009, 08:28 AM' post='279215'

Should i throw it away nad re-order (costly mistake!), or will it be ok??

james you must be rich!

i like using 5 or 10 year out of date film,clearly not good for a drama when you need to match shots,but always interesting.
i did a music video years ago i baked the cartridge in the oven,microwaved another and buried another in the garden for 3 weeks.
that pesky film is tough even the fungus growing on it did not degrade the image enough.
dumping raw film in the trash is like burning books,do not ever do it...worse case put it on ebay.
  • 0

#7 tom doherty

tom doherty
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Student
  • u.k

Posted 24 March 2009 - 08:03 PM

[quote name='alan doyle' post='279247' date='Mar 24 2009, 08:19 PM'][quote name='James Millward' date='Mar 24 2009, 08:28 AM' post='279215'

i like using 5 or 10 year out of date film,clearly not good for a drama when you need to match shots,but always interesting.
i did a music video years ago i baked the cartridge in the oven,microwaved another and buried another in the garden for 3 weeks.
that pesky film is tough even the fungus growing on it did not degrade the image enough.[/quote]

sounds great, got any uploaded footage?
  • 0

#8 Andries Molenaar

Andries Molenaar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 671 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Amsterdam

Posted 25 March 2009 - 03:37 AM

7 months is nothing and never a problem. unless it was kept in the glove comparment of a car in the sahara. for a number of years.

If if were all that sensitive it would be unusable as a consumer item. Which Super-8 is. Does anybody think tens of millions of people 30 years ago kept their films in the fridge, just to film family life???

Edited by Andries Molenaar, 25 March 2009 - 03:39 AM.

  • 0

#9 James Millward

James Millward
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 March 2009 - 12:06 PM

Lol, no I havent got money to burn. I would have beens eriously put out if I had had to bin it!!

I just wanted to make sure that I knew what I was in for after processing. As I say, Im a complete beginner, so will probaly make alot of mistakes. I need to know which are my mistakes, and which are the films.

Thanks guys
James
  • 0

#10 David Rakoczy

David Rakoczy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1579 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • USA

Posted 25 March 2009 - 12:55 PM

Put it in the fridge but don't freeze (at 0 deg).


Why, I have been storing mine in the freezer for decades... Kodak suggests freezing for 30 day or longer storage and refrigerator for less than 30 day.
  • 0

#11 alan doyle

alan doyle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Other

Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:03 PM

sounds great, got any uploaded footage?
[/quote]

cannot find a copy anywhere it was FINLEY QUAYE - ULTRA STIMULATION music video...
it was him singing in a tree on hampstead heath.
it was great fun.
because the baking and burying of the super 8 film did not damage the film enough i took the processed film and unspooled it in soho, tied it to a motorbike and dragged the film to a local coffee shop.
ended up with a big ball of mangled crap, i then gave it to soho's film clinic to prep for telecine. only no clean.
they looked at me like i was a looney..
sweet.

Edited by alan doyle, 25 March 2009 - 04:08 PM.

  • 0

#12 Oliver Christoph Kochs

Oliver Christoph Kochs
  • Sustaining Members
  • 323 posts
  • Film Loader
  • Germany

Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:25 PM

Why, I have been storing mine in the freezer for decades... Kodak suggests freezing for 30 day or longer storage and refrigerator for less than 30 day.


Ektachrome Super 8 has some added liquids to make it run smoother through the cartridge. There have been m-a-n-y complaints about this and so they're adding something with a silicone base that will not further harm when film is processed.
So, I would freeze any 16mm negative and BW stock but not S8 Ektachrome for now.
  • 0

#13 Oliver Christoph Kochs

Oliver Christoph Kochs
  • Sustaining Members
  • 323 posts
  • Film Loader
  • Germany

Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:29 PM

By the way, there is 100D Ektachrome and Velvia 50D also available for Super8.
  • 0

#14 David Rakoczy

David Rakoczy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1579 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • USA

Posted 29 March 2009 - 08:23 PM

Ektachrome Super 8 has some added liquids to make it run smoother through the cartridge. There have been m-a-n-y complaints about this and so they're adding something with a silicone base that will not further harm when film is processed.
So, I would freeze any 16mm negative and BW stock but not S8 Ektachrome for now.


Thanks Oliver... I had no idea S8s were loaded that way.. I assumed you could treat them the same as 35 & 16mm which I have been freezing for decades... so the S8 'cartridge' make the difference.
  • 0

#15 Pavan Deep

Pavan Deep
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • UK

Posted 30 March 2009 - 01:30 AM

Hi

Your film should be okay. I am in the UK too and rarely put my Super 8 film in the fridge. I usually keep it in my filing cabinet, sometimes for over 6 months and the film has always turned out fine. I believe that with Super 8 this makes the film run smoother, the few times I have stored Super 8 in a fridge I have ended up with unsteady footage.

Pav
  • 0

#16 tom doherty

tom doherty
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Student
  • u.k

Posted 31 March 2009 - 02:03 PM

Hi

Your film should be okay. I am in the UK too and rarely put my Super 8 film in the fridge. I usually keep it in my filing cabinet, sometimes for over 6 months and the film has always turned out fine. I believe that with Super 8 this makes the film run smoother, the few times I have stored Super 8 in a fridge I have ended up with unsteady footage.

Pav


i keep all my super8 in the fridge, some has been there since even last summer. i take the film out of the fridge and wait 45 minutes before putting it in the camera. wonder if this is why i get an unsteady image with lost of jitter?
  • 0

#17 Ben Reed

Ben Reed
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Other
  • UK

Posted 31 March 2009 - 02:52 PM

sounds great, got any uploaded footage?


cannot find a copy anywhere it was FINLEY QUAYE - ULTRA STIMULATION music video...
it was him singing in a tree on hampstead heath.
it was great fun.
because the baking and burying of the super 8 film did not damage the film enough i took the processed film and unspooled it in soho, tied it to a motorbike and dragged the film to a local coffee shop.
ended up with a big ball of mangled crap, i then gave it to soho's film clinic to prep for telecine. only no clean.
they looked at me like i was a looney..
sweet.



Alan, that's amazing and tragic (the bit about no copy). I'd forgotten all about Finlay Quaye, my mum had his first album, but I only really remember the singles. I just got really excited because I thought I'd found your video on youtube in a long clip from the ITV chart show (the only place I ever saw music videos as a kid), but the pricks only show one minute of it before cutting to Steps (argh!) it's here (it starts at 3:20)

It's really gutting cos it looks fantastic (still better one minute's than nothing). It sounds a gutsy experiment to try out, esp for a commission; hats off to you! You should see if the label still has a beta master (I expect the rushes are long gone?)
  • 0

#18 alan doyle

alan doyle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Other

Posted 31 March 2009 - 08:49 PM

][/url] (it starts at 3:20)

It's really gutting cos it looks fantastic (still better one minute's than nothing). It sounds a gutsy experiment to try out,


ben, sherlock holmes.
thanks very much for that i have not seen that since the telecine...
it looked really good...poop 10 years ago,i thought it was only 7.
the really grainy stuff was custom super 8 ilford hp5 rated at 800asa...the finer grain black and white was the amazing beautiful agfa apx 25asa and colour was 200asa neg 93 stock, i used my pixelvision and old video cameras.
i have done lot's of jobs without ever getting copies..
did a a good super 8 portishead video called over and not so good one erasure solsbury hill directed by vince clarke.
and a load of stuff with mark linkous of sparklehorse.
but hats off to you for finding finleys clip..
cheers
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

CineTape

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Opal

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC