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Novice Dp trying to get this look from Blade Runner


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#1 David Calson

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 10:39 PM

I want to get the venetian blinds on the ceiling like this shot, how do you think they he did it?

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#2 Ryan Thomas

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 11:36 PM

You should probably change your name to be your first and last name before someone sees.

But basically, get a light, get some venetian blinds, then shoot your light up through the venetian blinds to project it on the ceiling. Remember the further away you put the light, the harder the shadow will be.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 12:59 AM

Or an open frame with a bunch of tape on it. Open faced fixtures don't tend to look very nice for this because they will make multiple shadows of the blinds. Best to do a fresnel fixture at full flood. As Ryan says, the pattern cast will be soft if the blinds are close to the light. If the blinds are close to the surface they are projecting the pattern onto, the pattern will be hard.

In that still, it looks like they used the blinds you can see in the window to cast the pattern.
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#4 David Calson

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 12:37 PM

You should probably change your name to be your first and last name before someone sees.


I've been posting for almost 5 years, I think people have seen my REAL name by now. Thanks for the tips guys.
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#5 Ralph Keyser

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 06:06 PM

I'd say the trick here is the geometry. The light looks to be on a pretty steep angle, and the shadows are reasonably sharp. I'm not sure you'd get that with a lamp on the ground outside a window. Maybe this is a second floor location. Hmm. Anyway, I agree that they shot through blinds as opposed to the tape gag. The other advantage to real blinds is that you can play with the tilt of the blades to get just the right shadows.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 02:49 AM

I'd say the trick here is the geometry. The light looks to be on a pretty steep angle, and the shadows are reasonably sharp. I'm not sure you'd get that with a lamp on the ground outside a window. Maybe this is a second floor location. Hmm. Anyway, I agree that they shot through blinds as opposed to the tape gag. The other advantage to real blinds is that you can play with the tilt of the blades to get just the right shadows.



It could be a bigger fixture further away and high up bouncing off of mirrors on the ground right outside the window.
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