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motion film in a still camera?


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#1 Tom Norris

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 07:32 AM

hey guys, just wondering if it's possible to shoot motion film in a still camera... or if there's any companies that format kodak or fuji for still use... orrrr if there's a resource where I could find still film equivalents of motion film, just trying to do lighting tests without spending a lot of money
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#2 Ian Cooper

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 08:28 AM

hey guys, just wondering if it's possible to shoot motion film in a still camera... or if there's any companies that format kodak or fuji for still use... orrrr if there's a resource where I could find still film equivalents of motion film, just trying to do lighting tests without spending a lot of money


Yes it will work, but find a lab who will be prepared to develop the film for you before wasting your time loading it into cartridges and exposing it.

Motion picture film is developed in ECN2 chemistry, not the C41 chemistry used for regular stills film. If you search through previous postings on the forum you'll find the subject being discussed a number of times.
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#3 Tom Norris

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 06:55 PM

Yes it will work, but find a lab who will be prepared to develop the film for you before wasting your time loading it into cartridges and exposing it.

Motion picture film is developed in ECN2 chemistry, not the C41 chemistry used for regular stills film. If you search through previous postings on the forum you'll find the subject being discussed a number of times.


ah I see, thanks! is it possible to load motion film into a still camera though? or does it need to be formatted
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#4 Jim Keller

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 07:11 PM

ah I see, thanks! is it possible to load motion film into a still camera though? or does it need to be formatted


You can use any typical bulk loader with 100' daylight spools. Used to do it all the time before RGB Lab shut down, and I had nowhere to process it any more.
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:20 AM

You can't send it to a stills lab. Neg film has an anti-reflective backing (remjet) which has to be removed before processing. In a C41 line it would ruin the chemicals and probably the machinery as well; I believe it closely resembles tar.
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#6 Bruce Greene

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 01:36 PM

hey guys, just wondering if it's possible to shoot motion film in a still camera... or if there's any companies that format kodak or fuji for still use... orrrr if there's a resource where I could find still film equivalents of motion film, just trying to do lighting tests without spending a lot of money


No problem, loading the film, but finding a place to process it, not so easy. I've got a bunch of 5218 in my bulk loader now, but the lab that processed it, no longer does. I just went to a raw stock reseller and they gave me some free film that was too short to sell.

I shot a film in eastern europe last year and the still photographer shot movie film for the interior scenes. Dumbfounded, I asked where he would find to process it in Tbilisi? Answer: His kitchen! He said something about ordering the chemicals on-line from Paris and that he removed the backing with a squeegee:)

Of course for your lighting test you would probably want it printed to motion picture print stock, but I think you'll be limited to scanning the negatives nowadays. I guess it will be a good preview for what you can do in a DI.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 02:30 PM

There IS a lab in NYC, a regular movie lab, that will run the shorter lengths. They're a bit pricey though, $10 I think per roll.

Sorry, I forget off the top of my head which one it is.

Then there's Dale in Florida.
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#8 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 02:54 PM

I used this lab about a year and half ago: strangely their website no longer mentions the service now.

http://www.aandi.com/

Here is some of the stuff they developed, printed and scanned.

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#9 Simon Wyss

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 03:04 PM

ah I see, thanks! is it possible to load motion film into a still camera though? or does it need to be formatted

My, oh, my. 35-mm motion picture film is formatted, it is the oldest movie film format still in use. The picture image size and aspect ratio will be defined by your camera's aperture which typically is 24 by 36 millimeters (8-perf. film advance).

Any movie film lab should be prepared to run your 5 feet through the machine since they all add pre-exposed check strips to the rolls in regular intervals. It's more a matter of explaining the contact person that you choose the double sized frame for technical reasons. Sometimes a small present can work more than 10$. Depends also on the gender.
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#10 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 06:55 PM

Sometimes a small present can work more than 10$. Depends also on the gender.


Ha ha ha, I like your reasoning! I'll have to try this with some labs if A and I Lab aren't doing it anymore.
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#11 Zack Spiger

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 04:05 PM

Go to Andec in Berlin and the friendly folks there will do it for you. I did some 500T and 250d there a couple of months ago.
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#12 Tom Jensen

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 04:48 PM

http://local.botw.or...b/39509253.html
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#13 Fran Kuhn

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 06:32 PM

http://local.botw.or...b/39509253.html


Hi Tom,

Unfortunately, RGB Lab has been closed for several years. A&I in Hollywood offered MP stock processing through a third party for a while, but they no longer offer the service.
-Fran
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#14 Tom Jensen

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 09:06 PM

Hi Tom,

Unfortunately, RGB Lab has been closed for several years.


Me too!
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#15 Tim Sutherland

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 09:14 PM

I called Fotokem a while ago and they said they'll do it, it's something like 14cents a foot but a $50 minimum. I shot a roll, and then it sat around, so I ended up just taking it to Walgreens (after they told me it should be fine with their filters for their chemicals) and got it processed 1-hour.

It came out with some of the remjet still on, which I cleaned off with a microfiber towel and then had scanned. Colors came out very nice, desaturated cool colors with more saturated warm tones. Contrast and exposure stayed more or less the same.

Tim

Edited by Tim Sutherland, 30 May 2009 - 09:15 PM.

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#16 Hal Smith

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 01:29 PM

According to the Boys from Oz, Atlab in Sydey has a standard service for motion film shot for tests in still cameras. Priority Mail for a standard 8-5/8" x 5-3/8" x 1-5/8" box is $12.95 to Sydney and takes approximately one week. Anyone from Oz here that can estimate postage back to the US for one week service?
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#17 Dominic Case

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 09:54 PM

Atlab in Sydey has a standard service for motion film shot for tests in still cameras.

OK. Several points.
Atlab Sydney is now Deluxe Sydney - same contact details but website is now www.bydeluxe.com

Mail or Express Post out of Aust will cost anything between around AUD20 and AUD55 depending on how quickly you want it. AUD20 is for registered post, AUD55 for Express Post. Ordinary Airmail is AUD15. You can check it out on the Australia Post website.

Beware of shipping UNprocessed film by ordinary mail services. Think X-rays. Think again.

Not sure what the lab now charges (as I'm no longer there), but from memory you might expect around $12-15 (AUD - that's more like US$20) for process only: but the gotcha is a minimum bill amount which might be around $50. So it's not worth sending one cassette, you'd want to shoot several.

Another important practical detail - when neg is processed in a continuous processor, each roll is joined to the next in an overlapping join with a couple of inches of film overlapping. So, also allowing for handling at each end, it's a good idea to wind on about 5 exposures before you start the roll, and only shoot until you are 5 frames from the end of the roll. For a standard 5 foot exposure length (normally 36 still frames) that gives you around 25 or 26 frames.
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#18 Hal Smith

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 11:38 PM

Thanks Dominic,

Looks like it's a wash if, as rumored, Fotokem here is willing to process short rolls. Their minimum is $50 USD.

You're right, X-Ray would be a concern for unprocessed film shipped standard mail.

I'm real tempted to see what my Walgreen's here in Edmond says about Remjet, the lady who runs their minilab is pretty sharp.
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#19 Jim Carlile

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 03:35 AM

I wonder what the other Walgreens customers said when they had remjet all over their prints. How did they get the backing off in the first place?

Try B/W motion picture film-- no problem with processing. You can even reverse it, too, for fun.

Edited by Jim Carlile, 01 June 2009 - 03:37 AM.

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#20 Tim Sutherland

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 09:57 AM

I wonder what the other Walgreens customers said when they had remjet all over their prints. How did they get the backing off in the first place?

Try B/W motion picture film-- no problem with processing. You can even reverse it, too, for fun.



Walgreens didn't get the remjet off, it was still on the neg in powder form after processing. They told me that it was ruined and gave me the negative. I took it home and cleaned it myself, just for fun, and took it back. There were a few scratches from my rudimentary cleaning, but most of the photos came out pretty well.

I'd be interested to see what a more qualified Walgreens photo tech would say about the remjet.
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