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fuji 400T 35mm quick tips


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#1 Shubham Kasera

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 07:49 AM

hello
im about to start shoot in 2 days time. ive acquired some 400T fuji cans for the shoot. any past experiences in handling this stock would be helpful to me.
let me know how did this stock fare under lighting conditions.
im planning to shoot indoors under studio controlled environment.

thanks
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 09:39 AM

hello
im about to start shoot in 2 days time. ive acquired some 400T fuji cans for the shoot. any past experiences in handling this stock would be helpful to me.
let me know how did this stock fare under lighting conditions.
im planning to shoot indoors under studio controlled environment.

thanks



rate it at EI 250 and you will be all set. check out on TV "House" or on DVD "Midnight Meat Train" to see two very different looks the stock can deliver. I personally think it is quite nice. It renders very realistic, smooth flesh tones. I recommend a a photochemical finish, if you can afford it.
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 11:50 AM

It's my favorite stock from Fuji. Nice and organic and a bit low con.

If you look at my website, there's a BMW commercial I shot on where I rated it at 800 ASA and mainly used all available light with Hawk V-lite anamorphics wide open. It's pretty damn grainy, but most of that is because the lab screwed up (there's a recurring increase of grain every 2-3 seconds or something, like a breathing). Still pretty impressive. The light levels were criminally low and I was beyond the very edge of the neg, yet it still kind of manages to get by even after the lab has cocked up.

The park lights going out sequentially is mad grainy, but the grain in that particular shot is my favorite. Something about it - it almost looks like a haze. I can tell you that my light meter read this is as barely f1.0 and my lens opened up to T2.2...

BMW
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#4 Shubham Kasera

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 12:41 PM

hey
thnx
this info is good!
jus wondering what is photochemical process?
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 11:23 PM

hey
thnx
this info is good!
jus wondering what is photochemical process?



the traditional way of finishing a film, rather than going through a DI.
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#6 Shubham Kasera

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 11:47 PM

the traditional way of finishing a film, rather than going through a DI.


oh ok
well we are going through that way only
we dont have a budget for a DI

thanks
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#7 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 11:58 PM

I would not underexpose and print up by any more than one stop if you're finishing photochemically. The grain structure of 400T really falls apart fast after that. I find the stock to be a bit more contrasty and a little grainier than the Kodak 5229 500T Expression, if that gives you any idea.

Are you shooting regular 1.85:1 or anamorphic? My comments were based on a 1.85 workprint, so if you're shooting anamorphic you may find the stock to be less grainy since you're working with a bigger negative.
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#8 Shubham Kasera

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 12:15 AM

I would not underexpose and print up by any more than one stop if you're finishing photochemically. The grain structure of 400T really falls apart fast after that. I find the stock to be a bit more contrasty and a little grainier than the Kodak 5229 500T Expression, if that gives you any idea.

Are you shooting regular 1.85:1 or anamorphic? My comments were based on a 1.85 workprint, so if you're shooting anamorphic you may find the stock to be less grainy since you're working with a bigger negative.


ill be shooting in anamorphic
would u suggest me to rate it at 250 or 320?
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#9 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 03:00 AM

ill be shooting in anamorphic
would u suggest me to rate it at 250 or 320?

Well, either is probably fine. I'd go 250ASA for the tightest grain and good blacks.
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#10 Shubham Kasera

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 03:03 AM

Well, either is probably fine. I'd go 250ASA for the tightest grain and good blacks.

great
thnx

do u suggest me to pull process the stock too??
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#11 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 06:38 PM

do u suggest me to pull process the stock too??

No, not unless you want even lower contrast. I don't even think most labs will be able to pull 2/3 stop, so if they pull 1 stop then you'd be 1/3 stop under again. 400T is a low contrast stock to begin with and the little extra overexposure will help the blacks.
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