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Student film lighting help


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#1 Joseph Albano IV

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 09:08 AM

Hi,
I am making a short student film and we are trying to figure out the best way to film a hotel and a restaurant. We are working with small lights. We have two Arri 300s, two Arri 150s, two Diva 200s, and a Lowel Omni (I believe it is a 650). The hotel has dark hallways and is a simple hotel room. For the restaurant we are looking to light from above as if we have a light hanging down but we have no way of hanging a light down. The scenes are of simple dialogue and awkwardness between a mother, her son, and his girlfriend. Let me know what you think. Any ideas would help a lot.
Thanks

Edited by Joseph Albano IV, 30 March 2009 - 09:08 AM.

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#2 JD Hartman

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 03:36 PM

More information (gathered from the location scout) would make it easier to offer possible solutions. What kind of lighting does the resaurant have? What kind of ceilings? Any above that a light could be clamped onto or hung from. What about using a paper lantern? Could it be hung from a boom, off camera? What kind of lights are in the hallways? Can the bulbs be replaced with brighter ones?

Edited by JD Hartman, 30 March 2009 - 03:37 PM.

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#3 Joseph Albano IV

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 05:42 PM

More information (gathered from the location scout) would make it easier to offer possible solutions. What kind of lighting does the resaurant have? What kind of ceilings? Any above that a light could be clamped onto or hung from. What about using a paper lantern? Could it be hung from a boom, off camera? What kind of lights are in the hallways? Can the bulbs be replaced with brighter ones?


Here's a link to pictures of the hotel room from one side and the reverse angle.
Hotel Pics
The scene takes place at night. I'd like to light it as if it were by lamps in the room. Again, I have two 300s and two 150s, as well as a 650 Omni. I also have Divas but I think they would be too soft. So my questions are:
1) Does it look possible to shoot a wideshot of the whole room? That is, is there anywhere to hide lights?
2) What would be the best way to light one wideshot of the bed and one wideshot of the chair, as if lit by the lamps in the room?
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#4 Bob Hayes

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 06:46 PM

You may want to rent some films that have the mood, subject matter, or locations you have. This can give you an idea of how to approach your picture. You have to ask yourself creatively what you want to do before you ask yourself technically how to achieve it.
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#5 Bruce Southerland

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 09:14 AM

Here's a link to pictures of the hotel room from one side and the reverse angle.
Hotel Pics
The scene takes place at night. I'd like to light it as if it were by lamps in the room. Again, I have two 300s and two 150s, as well as a 650 Omni. I also have Divas but I think they would be too soft. So my questions are:
1) Does it look possible to shoot a wideshot of the whole room? That is, is there anywhere to hide lights?
2) What would be the best way to light one wideshot of the bed and one wideshot of the chair, as if lit by the lamps in the room?

First, I would increase the output of the practical lamps as much as safely possible. Then, for
the bed shot, you can bounce light off a white card or a white sheet (may use the ceiling also)near the left corner of the room. Then you can do the same from the right side for your fill(you may want your fill to be a larger/softer source than your key). Then when you move in for your closer shots, you can change the lighting a bit to make it look more flattering, keeping the direction of the key & fill roughly the same.
The shot of the door will be a bit easier, the key coming from the direction of the lamps. You will just have to balance the output of the three sources to acheive the mood you're going for.
This is a start. Hope it helps.
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#6 Joseph Albano IV

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 11:52 AM

Thank you all for the input on this matter, I truly appreciate it.

I am going for a fairly low key look. Light motivated from the lamps on either side of bed. Shot of someone on the bed. And a separate setup of someone sitting in the chair in the corner(the lamp behind chair will be moved). Practicals could be in shot, but we don't want them to blow out

Thanks!
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