Jump to content


Photo

Tips for a beginner please :) !


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Tom Law

Tom Law
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 31 March 2009 - 07:31 PM

Hello,

I am a film student in London, and my next assignment is a one minute short. I have chosen to use 8mm, as i am a big fan of film, i bought a Braun Nizo s560. I often shoot on film with my still slr camera. I have a pretty good understanding of shutter speed, aperture etc, but i would like to hear your tips, as i am sure aperture, shutter speed etc is quite different on an 8mm camera.

What are the basic things to look out for? I just bought some film (Kodak EKTACHROME 64T Colour Reversal), that i am going to shoot on next week. To clarify - does this mean the ISO of the film is 64? As this is quite slow, so how do i ensure that my footage will look ok?

I'm basically asking for anyones tips, and pointers, things that they have picked up on the way etc.

Many many thanks!!

Tom
  • 0

#2 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 31 March 2009 - 07:54 PM

Hello Tom,

Welcome to the forum. Your S8 is just like your still film camera except it takes 24 pictures per second. Set everything like you already know how to and shoot your thing. Shooting it right is fine. Screwing up is even better. Make your mistakes and get used to re-shooting. It's a great feeling when you project it and it's perfect. Get as many miles of film and tape behind you as soon as you can. Nothing replaces just doing it.
  • 0

#3 Tom Law

Tom Law
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 31 March 2009 - 08:40 PM

Hello Tom,

Welcome to the forum. Your S8 is just like your still film camera except it takes 24 pictures per second. Set everything like you already know how to and shoot your thing. Shooting it right is fine. Screwing up is even better. Make your mistakes and get used to re-shooting. It's a great feeling when you project it and it's perfect. Get as many miles of film and tape behind you as soon as you can. Nothing replaces just doing it.


Thanks for your reply :)
  • 0

#4 Jamie Noakes

Jamie Noakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Director
  • Östersund, Sweden

Posted 01 April 2009 - 01:36 AM

Hello,

I am a film student in London, and my next assignment is a one minute short. I have chosen to use 8mm, as i am a big fan of film, i bought a Braun Nizo s560. I just bought some film (Kodak EKTACHROME 64T Colour Reversal), that i am going to shoot on next week. To clarify - does this mean the ISO of the film is 64? As this is quite slow, so how do i ensure that my footage will look ok?

I'm basically asking for anyones tips, and pointers, things that they have picked up on the way etc.

Many many thanks!!

Tom

Hi Tom!

Just some basics-

The Nizo 560 is a great little camera and will give you the opportunity to make some fantastic super 8 films! Well, the 64t in question, as you have noticed has a 'T' denomination - which means it's a tungsten balanced film and so if your are shooting indoors under artificial light - with the filter switched to the 'Lightbulb' position - the film speed will indeed be 64 ASA/ISO etc. If you are shooting outdoors with the 'sunlight' filter position, I believe the film will drop to 40 ASA/ISO.

Yes it's a slow film, but with the right light it can look great! If you are shooting outdoors in good sunlight – you should have no problems achieving good results!
Indoors as long as you have enough light it can still look good! Your Nizo has split image focusing and as long as you make sure you have focused correctly you will get crisp images - of course as you know focusing is more critical the at the wider/lower F-stops - not only will your depth of field be shallow but some lenses are very soft when wide open. Of course this can be used to effect - should you want it! I think you are aware of all this from your stills photography!

I agree with the other reply - just go and have fun shooting film and get some experience - you will get to know the camera!

You’re probably aware that if you shoot at 18fps you will get 3minutes and 20seconds of footage and at 24fps you will get 2minutes and 30seconds of footage. Shooting at 24fps is better if you plan to transfer to video. You can still transfer at 18fps but your images will have a jerkier and less smooth movement. Your Nizo also has a fantastic slow motion option of 54fps! Not to mention the time-lapse capabilities!

Have fun and let us know how you get on!

Jamie
  • 0

#5 alan doyle

alan doyle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Other

Posted 01 April 2009 - 02:16 PM

experiment,test get a cheap projector use ektachrome send it too andec.
by projecting it is a cheaper way to see and understand mistakes.
a great way to see what your camera is doing.
by testing and playing you will understand,what works for you.

do not worry, check this out this was an official video with a proper funded budget. .
it is crap.
this is what i call squirtyvision,using a camera like a water pistol.

so no matter what happens i am sure you will do better than the highly paid crew on that film.
  • 0

#6 Christopher Curry

Christopher Curry
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Student
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 03 April 2009 - 06:21 AM

[/url]


Wowza! Knowing THAT kind of video was released for an international artist makes me a feel a whole lot more confident to be behind a camera!

Edited by Christopher Curry, 03 April 2009 - 06:21 AM.

  • 0

#7 alan doyle

alan doyle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 April 2009 - 07:26 PM

Wowza! Knowing THAT kind of video was released for an international artist makes me a feel a whole lot more confident to be behind a camera!



the goldfrapp thing should be a real inspiration for newbies.
10 thousand pound budget, 800 pound a day cameraman and a director plus crew..
and i bet everyone on this site could have done better.
and this is not unique i have seen much worse.
this was a classic example of an arrogant camera crew not testing and not really caring or thinking,you can have a dp who's 35mm work is amazing as soon as you hand him a super 8 he leaves his brain at home.
my favorite super 8 work is nearly always shot by non pro's.
  • 0

#8 Jamie Noakes

Jamie Noakes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Director
  • Östersund, Sweden

Posted 04 April 2009 - 02:55 AM

the goldfrapp thing should be a real inspiration for newbies.
10 thousand pound budget, 800 pound a day cameraman and a director plus crew..
and i bet everyone on this site could have done better.
and this is not unique i have seen much worse.
this was a classic example of an arrogant camera crew not testing and not really caring or thinking,you can have a dp who's 35mm work is amazing as soon as you hand him a super 8 he leaves his brain at home.
my favorite super 8 work is nearly always shot by non pro's.


Bloody hell - how did they make the paperwork look good? - I would have loved to see the final budget breakdown after that shoot!

I can only see it looking like this -

50 pence for the Crappy Super 8 camera picked up from a charity shop.

A few quid for the couple of rolls of film stock.

Then I find it hard to find reason for any of the following:-

I'm guessing it was a one day shoot - and the term 'cameraman' must be used in loose terms surely? £800 a day I would definitely suggest checking with the 'Trade Descriptions Act'.

What Director? Would be my next question.

What crew were necessary - did the camera man need an assistant to 'load' or take care of the fresh/exposed filmstock? Surely his or her pockets would have sufficed?

No need for Grip – (accept the loose one on the camera!)

No sound.

Lighting?

Continuity?

Make up perhaps?

Catering for the minimal crew and Alison?

Some money perhaps spent in post - but it looks like a home telecine job and no need for a pro telecine tech or colourist that I can find evidence for!

Where did the money go?

Some people will argue that they were going for the 'lo-fi' look as if some half-cut donkey had filmed it etc... That is all fine - but why the need for a 10K budget?

There are so many creative and talented people out there having a rough ride finding even the most minimal of funding or any at all.

As you say Alan, anyone on this forum could shoot better – I would even go as for as to say just ‘Anyone’ could do better.
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Tai Audio

CineLab

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio