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Question about effect


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#1 Aaron Steven

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 10:58 PM

Hi everybody,
I'm a first time poster and a senior at Towson University. I'm about to take on my final short film as DP, and I have a question about a particular effect that i'm trying to replicate.

First of all, I am shooting on an Panasonic HVX-200 with a SG-PRO flip-module 35mm lens adapter. The lenses I have at my disposal are NIKON 28mm, 50mm, 105mm, and 300mm.

Now for my best crack at describing the effect:
You see it A LOT in the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan, from just about the moment that they blow the barb wire open. The fires in the environment all have a sharp vertical blurs stemming from them, and there are also noticable flare-ups and blurs throughout the scene that i'm guessing are all from a particular filter or from something that they were shooting through. Im sorry I don't have any screengrabs, but hopefully somebody knows what I am referring to. It's also highly utilized in Stephen Soderburgh's The Limey, during all of the flashback scenes and in particular the one with the burning car.


Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

-Aaron
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#2 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 12:09 AM

That effect in both those films comes from using a camera with the pulldown phase out of sync with the shutter. In other words, normally the shutter is closed while the film is pulled down through the gate, but for this effect they have it slightly offset, so that a portion of the exposure happens while the film is being transported vertically through the gate, which causes bright areas to smear upwards. There really isn't any way to do this with a digital camera, since the physical action doesn't exist. Your options are basically to:

1. Shoot on film, either with a camera that's been deliberately offset, or with something like an Arri 435 Extreme, which lets you throw off the phase interactively (I think) using a control box
2. Use some sort of streak filter. I know that there are ones for horizontal streaks, but I don't remember offhand if you can rotate them or if you need a different one.
3. Approximate the effect in compositing.
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#3 Aaron Steven

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 01:34 AM

That effect in both those films comes from using a camera with the pulldown phase out of sync with the shutter. In other words, normally the shutter is closed while the film is pulled down through the gate, but for this effect they have it slightly offset, so that a portion of the exposure happens while the film is being transported vertically through the gate, which causes bright areas to smear upwards. There really isn't any way to do this with a digital camera, since the physical action doesn't exist. Your options are basically to:

1. Shoot on film, either with a camera that's been deliberately offset, or with something like an Arri 435 Extreme, which lets you throw off the phase interactively (I think) using a control box
2. Use some sort of streak filter. I know that there are ones for horizontal streaks, but I don't remember offhand if you can rotate them or if you need a different one.
3. Approximate the effect in compositing.


Thanks man, looking into streak filters now. I had a feeling it was something in-camera, and since I am shooting HD with an adapter I also sorta figured that it would be impossible for me to replicate...but thanks for tellin me what it was!
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Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Aerial Filmworks

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Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

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