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#1 Austin Michaels

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 11:43 PM

I am planning out a short movie and i got stuck on a scene were a man gets in a car accident and dies.

The person who hit him ran a red light and hit the man in the side of the car.

well my set up of it was to do mostly all greenscreen of the window in the car.

But approaching the light and the man stopping at the light and do a cutaway of the intersection and the light turning green.

then it will go back to the car of the driver and window in frame. But this will be stationary because this part i will be putting up the green screen on the window.

car 1 innocent driver
car 2 red light runner

How the green screen would work would be to have the car 1 in the middle of the intersection and car 2 on the side basically touching the door. then on action everyone goes into reverse but car 1 stops at the line while car 2 just goes really fast backwards.

and ideas or suggestions?

Also to add once it hits it will go to a cutaway of a women acting like something bad happened. so the rest i can get a junk car and smash it up.
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#2 Austin Michaels

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 11:21 PM

so since no one is posting is this a good idea or what??
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#3 Bob Hayes

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Posted 09 April 2009 - 07:43 PM

You’re not getting any posts because you are not clearly describing how you plan to shoot your sequence.

For example:
“well my set up of it was to do mostly all green screen of the window in the car.”

You mention you plan to do a green screen of the window. This may mean the window is part of the green screen or the window is practical and the green screen is placed out side the window. Because green screen is so technical you really have to be exact with your choice of words.

Your entire post is equally difficult to understand with incomplete thoughts and descriptions. I think this has led to a lack of response. Film making is really difficult to describe using the written word. You need to take a little more care with regard to what you put in your posts if you want responses. Read them back to yourself. Do you understand what you are saying?

I hope you take this input in the spirit it was given. I am a terrible speller and often have a difficult time completing sentences that makes sense. Take heart, film making is a visual medium and the written word is just part of the process. But, it is an important part.
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#4 moe kanz

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 06:43 AM

for the actual crash moment you could try pulling away at speed in reverse in car1 away fom an alredy smashed up car 2 then just reverse the footage!
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#5 Austin Michaels

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 12:43 AM

Ya i might end up doing that. I have thought of that but the problem is how much $$$ i get for this short.

but thanks for the idea.
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 08:13 AM

Don't try crashing real cars without a stunt pro or racer in the loop. I crashed a couple of cars years ago when I was a boy racer for a National Safety Council film and the level of preparation for the drivers and cars was extensive. We had full racing harnesses, wore Nomex driver's suits, the cars had the seats pulled and real racing driver's seats installed, the car interiors were stripped of anything that could cause an injury, carried a very small auxilliary safety gas tank, etc., etc. All this for a couple of crashes with stationary "target" cars that took place at around ten miles per hour. Even with all that it's still pretty dramatic to whack into another car at 10mph!
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#7 Joe Giambrone

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 12:02 PM

I agree with both responses --

I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to do.
Be very careful.

But let me run this idea past you.

You lock down the camera at the intersection (a quiet intersection). You speed one car by. Then you speed the other car by at 90 degrees. You take the two clips and mix them together with the magic of post production. Then you have two cars that appear to be rocketing toward one another such that there's no way they can possibly miss.

Then, the crash is mostly sound and interiors. Done.
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Glidecam

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Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS